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how i feel about my ADD?ADHD
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cupcakewhit posted:
I started to notice that I had the symptoms of ADD at a young age, as did my parents. they just thought okay shes just a little airy. my mom didnt want to put me on medication at such a young age and i did form habits that helped me cope with my problems. I am almost 22 years old an still am frustrated that i loose things forget what i am doing in the middle of a task have a hard time retaining what people ask me to do at work, will start a task then begin another, an forget about the original task, I find my self hyper almost all the time, sometimes have a hard time sitting still, always, have had racing thoughts. I draw often, this is one of the only ways i can just loose myself an calm my mind. what i am most frustrated with is my job requires me to multitask at all times and i have been putting off going in to get medication because im told i could loose my creativity an be more or less personality wise sluggish. ive accomplished many things in my life an feel that my ADD isn't so much as there is something wrong with me but i feel i need something that will give me the right mind frame to help me excel in the areas i am lacking im tired of being frustrated because i have to try so hard to concentrate. ive tryed so many diffrent tricks to help with day to day things, i still don't have a complete hold on things. i would like some advice please...
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aybara responded:
I didn't like being on meds because of the personality change I experienced. However, you may not experience that. Assuming you do not want to go the med route, here are some tips that might help.

Caffeine can help with the hyper-activity.

Try having a place for things. Always put your keys, wallet, planner (etc) in the same spot. (I will admit I still have issues with this one.)

Depending on the tasks-maybe you could draw while you do them since that seems to help you focus? I am also a big proponent of the List. Seriously, keeping a list and checking it off has been a huge help for me.

Honestly, there are somethings that will probably always be a struggle. You just have to decide if it worth it or not.For me, it has been.
 
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Gina Pera responded:
It is a myth that people with ADHD will lose their "creativity" if they pursue treatment for ADHD.

Now, you want to make sure that you don't take such a high dose of stimulant that it "flattens" you. You want to proceed cautiously -- starting at a low dosage and working your way up to the most effective dose.

You say that you can't retain what people ask you to do at work. You are hyper almost all the time, have a hard time sitting still. You lose things. Have racing thoughts. And you think there's nothing "wrong" here?

Perhaps art is soothing for you, but that doesn't mean it's going to compensate for all these other challenges.

How about you try treatment for a while and decide for yourself whether it is improving your life or not?
 
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texastaryn responded:
I can relate to what you are going through and at 40 can tell you that I still haven't outgrown it. I did take medicine when I was in college. I found that I consistentally scored high 80's and low 90's on tests. Without meds, I could score really high or in the 70's. Meds helped me be consistant when I needed it. Starting out in my career I knew it would take me longer to do the work because I would let distractions dominate my time. (I later learned to handle interruptions) I made up for it by working late and through lunch and keeping a work journal kept me from forgetting details. The more preoccupied I was - the worse my forgetfullness (think about things you can control instead). To calm my busy mind I would go for a jog, workout, or read. If I had an assignment that required full concentration I would listen to celtic music with a fast beat. The most important advice I can give is not to "force" yourself to be normal. Celebrate your gift - a skilled ADD is unparalleled at handling fast paced environments like trading and air traffic control or running their own business. I love being ADD and people never suspect I am because I have learned impulse control and redirect my creative energy into surprise parties or design or by doing something thoughtful for others. Life is too short to take so seriously.