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ADD/ADHD: Does one 'grow out" of it?
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tklawson posted:
This question is intriguing. One psychiatrist in the late 1980's claimed this may be the case. Indeed some with the affiction-previously called 'minimal brain dysfunction" learned to cope with the symptoms. Some used humor, charm, and other skills- to not seem to be to inadvertantly unattentive-or generally claim a disinterest or casual unimportance to what the person trying to keep the attention, interest, or less than enthusiastic people from completely withdrawing outright. Most say, no- the person doesn't 'grow out ' of it. The socioeconomic factors show lower income,production, lack of completion, education that is < satisfactory. Case in point: myself. 58 Yrs. young, adolesent neurologists were few and far between in Fresno, CA in the 1960's In my late 40's a good psychiatrist/neurologist with the assistance of a NP-C, PA-C and a RN-advanced certification(all 3 ) Was informed after no effort was taken by others-and the FDA approved the use of these agents for use in adults, undertook my case history and treatment with excellent result. Stating that I was born premature at 7 months by a mother who smoked while pregnant. slowly he with the psychiatrist found I was a plus 30 Yr student of pharmacy without the funds to go to pharmacy school. Still, I took most all the medical journals I could get. The others purchased or borrowed. Including nursing magazines and older issues of The Archives of General Psychiatry. these dated from the late 50's to the late 60''s. These older issues of the Archives although outdated and less than the best, none the less opened a door into the early infancy of psychiatry.This from the stand point of the older typical psychotropics. The experemental use of LSD-25 on soldiers. The ads for drugs out such as aliphatic and piperadine phenothiazines. Also anticholinergics like benztropine mesylate and trihexiphenadyl. Some ads suggesting blurred images of what some in the industry were using as advertising to those that no longer were taught that a probe inserted inside the top of the eye to reduce pre-frontal lobe brain function was either humane or actually a medical procedure of any use. At any rate, erer since the 70's I purchased a PDR and suppliments and read them cover to cover. The physician and PA-C caught on and knew that I was literate. Not only that, I was well versed and cognizant. He issues scripts for the appropriate meds and improvement was marked. Later in the midst of 9-11 I passed my licensure for pharmacy technology with over 90%. The progress continues. Luckily, a person of interest took some and the rest is just a continuation of the process of CE's and marrage to a RN. I was one of the few who was fortunate to get Tx.
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JeffMedStudent responded:
I am not an expert in ADD/ADHD. However, given several years of close observation, I have come to the opinion that there are several different syndromes/behavioral-patterns being diagnosed as ADD/ADHD, when in reality only a small subset are actually legitimate ADD/ADHD.

True ADD/ADHD has an anatomic and physiological basis (pre-frontally related for the most part). These physiological characteristics have certainly not been shown to be spontaneously "resolved" in people with ADD/ADHD as they age.

There are, in my mind, at least the following two routes via which a person with a childhood diagnosis of ADD/ADHD might be subsequently misinterpreted as having "grown-out of ADD/ADHD" as an adolescent or adult:

--- 1. The person who "learns to cope" with their ADD/ADHD by exposing themselves to vocations, relationships and social situations that allow them to thrive in spite of (or occasionally even especially due to) their ADD/ADHD.

--- 2. The person who in fact never actually had ADD/ADHD, but rather had some yet clinically-undefined syndrome that demonstrates similar characteristics in childhood (e.g. hyperactivity, inattentiveness, irritability, compulsivity) and was misdiagnosed with ADD/ADHD (due to lack of availability of an alternative diagnosis or lack of valid and reliable physiologic/anatomic diagnostic tests, NOT necessarily due to inappropriate application of the diagnostic criteria by psychiatrists).

In summary, I feel very strongly that people with organically-based ADD/ADHD simply do NOT "grow out of it." Just as the dog who has one leg amputated may go on to thrive in life and perhaps even run as fast as they once did with their full compliment of legs, it never "grows out of" having three legs.
 
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mzfroggez replied to JeffMedStudent's response:
would agree that you do NOT outgrow ADD.....i did learn to cope/work around issues - old enough to have no idea why i did things the way i did but smart enough/adept enough to figure out how i did learn and to drop anything that didn't work within my system. it was not until much later in life when i had to "work within the system" that things started to come apart/my coping mechanisms and way of doing it "differently" started to implode, resulting in everything in my life crashing. Finally, 9 years later, after going through anti-depressants and then the consideration of bi-polar issues, i suggested someone consider ADD, based on my answers to the screening for that. Now, with Adderol, I am discovering more and more about myself and how my brain works and how to work with it. Nope, definitely didn't outgrow it - (I was ADD before ADD was cool) - but what I have discovered that my funny little world that seemed to march to the beat of a different drummer is not only ok, but great in many respects. And now, i'm wise enough and secure enough to proceed without second-guessing "what's WRONG with me?????"
 
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tjproko responded:
does one grow out of it - no

does one learn workarounds - yes, or else jail and/or failure

Is there help in the medical community - more negative than positive. seek carefully and mindfully.

What happens if I do get good help - Happiness, peace, then re-evaluation of everything you experienced in your life.

What can I expect if i AM diagnosed later in life? - more emotional baggage than others.


Should I just let things be the way they are and not go forward about my potential ADD - NO! You will shake off many imaginery bonds and chains.
 
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Mamabeara1 replied to JeffMedStudent's response:
Wow, I like this answer someone who finally can tell the dang truth about this disorder! I am now in my late 30's and have known since very early childhood that I was ADHD and I have never outgrown it nor will I ever outgrow it. I have struggled with it my entire life as has my family with me. This is not an easy thing to deal with and it has been a total uphill struggle for myself as well as those around me and if you don't continue treatment then other things will go with it. In my experience, this is just my story by the way I have also developed with age Anxiety, Fibro and depression.

My Dad has had a hard time with it because like you have said there was not alot known about it 31 years ago. As for now the resources are Awesome!!! I know more now then I have ever known about ADHD and now how to help my own children so that they don't have to suffer down the same road that I had to travel, Thank God for that!

I just hate that the school system's are fighting so hard against us now and making us jump through so many hoops to help them. But, I will do what is necessary so that they will have a more normal life and not such a struggle as I did and still do...


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