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Post Nasal Drip
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bren8519 posted:
I am not sure if what I have is allergies or post nasal drip which I understand is a form of allergy. I tested negative for allergies on a blood test but going back for a prick test and second opinion. I was also diagnosed with minor reflux and put on meds but that did not stop the cough or the post nasal drip. On bad days I hack up lots of clear mucus on good days just small amounts. I clear my throat and it feels sore sometimes. I live on Claritin but sometimes it just does not always work. My husband is tired of me coughing at night and being sick. He is worried for me. I have had a cat scan of my sinus which showed very minor infection, chest xray, swallow test, and much blood work all to only still have this stuff. Has anyone found the answer to help make this go away? I want my normal life back. The only thing that made me feel normal was temporary relief from taking steriod pills. That was only for about a month and a half. Help someone!
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Aqua14 responded:
Try Zyrtec instead of Claritin; most people find that Zyrtec is much stronger than Claritin. Now that Zyrtec's over the counter and generic, it can be purchased fairly cheaply at WalMart. Additionally, try using a saline sinus rinse once or twice a day. You may be very surprised at how well that cheap, non-medicated solution can work and how much better you will feel. You can buy sinus rinse kits at any drug store for about $10-15. I'd recommend the squeeze bottle rather than the neti pot, which doesn't seem to work as well.

Since your symptoms cleared up when taking oral steroids, allergy is likely, but allergic asthma is also a possibility since oral steroids will ease asthma symptoms as well.

Good luck on your allergy skin prick tests; those are more sensitive and specific than the allergy blood tests, and within 15-20 minutes you will know what you are allergic to. If the skin prick tests don't show anything, be sure and ask the allergist if intradermal tests can be performed right afterwards. Some people aren't allergic enough to react on skin prick, but since the intradermal method uses a greater concentration of allergen serum, it will identify allergy in folks who are not highly allergic.

Hopefully these thoughts help. Take care and hang in there. Judy


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