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Horrible allergies to deodorant
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mapgirl8 posted:

Ok so for the past 7 years I have been getting horrible super painful hive type brakeouts under my arm and all the way down my side to the bottom of my rib cage. Sometimes its so painful I cant put my arm down. I live in hot sunny FL so it is embarrassing because I cant wear tank tops. I showed my friend and she instantly told me that it was an allergic reaction. She told me to try toms all natural deodorant. Suddenly 2 weeks later I was totally healed. Unfortunately now I always smell bad I am very active and in the 100 degree heat in FL this deodorant does not hold up. Does anyone have any suggestions on any all natural aluminum free deodorants that actually work. I use a regular brand the other day and the rash is beck. I cant live my life smelling horrible but right now my choice is smell bad or be in horrific pain.......
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DUKE MEDICINE
Michael H Land, MD responded:
Dear Mapgirl8,

What you've described above sounds like you may have developed a contact dermatitis to the antiperspirant in many common deodorants. Contact dermatitis is a type of delayed allergic reaction in the skin to a substance. This substance could be a chemical like the antiperspirant or it could be something as common as poison ivy. The difference between this allergy and other kinds of allergy is primarily that this type of reaction does not happen immediately, or within seconds (as if you have a peanut and then your lip swells and you have trouble breathing). Instead, it is a delayed type of allergy and the skin rashes up or blisters over a matter of hours to days.

Because of this delay, it is often more difficult to make an accurate diagnosis of the type of allergy (especially if it is hours or days after exposure when the rash comes up). Fortunately some tests like a PATCH TEST could help with making a diagnosis of what you're allergic to and need to avoid. It may be that just a certain substance present in common products is the problem, and you may have to go to a specialty store to get a deodorant that does not contain that particular substance.

I would recommend finding an allergy specialist or a dermatologist who does patch testing or can help determine if this is contact dermatitis (and what the allergen is). The other possibility is that you may have a condition called Hyperhidrosis. This type of problem is basically a condition of excessive sweating. Some dermatologists can treat this with regular injections of botox if it is too difficult to treat with topical therapies. I would suggest working with a specialist on this condition if it turns out that you cannot find a solution.

Good luck!
 
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PaigeEPowell responded:
You're not going to believe this, but in a pinch, a quick spray of vinegar works to kill the smell-causing bacteria immediately. Of course, you don't want to go around smelling like vinegar, so the trick is to wipe away any excess vinegar and then follow up with a non-antiperspirant deodorant that smells nice.
 
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An_232145 responded:
Try the Tom's roll on, not the stick. I had the same problem with the stick. You can also try cornstarch. If you have no sores, you can try soaps with tea tree oil in them. Witch Hazel is supposed to work well. I used a deodorant after a mammogram that they gave you to wipe on, in a little packet on a towelette, that had witch hazel and aloe and something else in it. that worked wonders. I wish I could find that again.
 
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Oceansunsetskies responded:
Well, there are many different things you can try. Here are some Organic sites you can check out, which may be helpful for your situation, as it's not uncommon to develop allergies at any given time.

http://miorganicproducts.com/bodycare/aroma_free_rollon_deodorant.php

http://www.alibaba.com/showroom/antiperspirant-roll-on-deodorant.html

http://organicglow.com/products/ancient-spice-roll-on-deodorant/

http://www.squidoo.com/Organic-Deodorant

http://www.sephora.com/browse/product.jhtml?id=P122707

http://www.herballoveshop.com/product.asp?PID=3575

If you want to learn more about the "Organic" stuff, check with a certified "organic or natural" doctor or go in to a health store that sells organic stuff & usually they have an on hand "certified" doctor you could ask some questions or if you want to read more links, you could type in "organic antiperspirant roll on deodorant" & it will pop up a whole list of them that you could go through as a way to learn more information.

In any case, I hope this helps you find your way.

Best of luck!
 
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dallasllowe responded:
I will share a recipe with you that not only works for me but also for my friends. You will need !/4 Cup arrowroot powder, or cornstarch [which sometimes contains talc, so I recommend arrowroot>, 1/4 cup baking soda and several tablespoons coconut oil. I also use a few drops of tea tree and peppermint essential oils. Tea tree is antibacterial and peppermint is cooling.
Mix the arrowroot and baking soda in a bowl. Add coconut oil by the tablespoon till it reaches the desired consistency.I like it firm but still spreadable. Coconut oil is a solid at room temperature so the temperature will decide how much you need. Add essential oils and place in a covered jar. This recipe will work whether you get it perfect or not. Experiment with it.
I am a heavy sweater that doesn' t like the ingredients in antiperspirants or deodorants. I found this and have never looked back. The ingredients are readily available in the grocery store, health food store, or online. The only thing you have to be careful about is that if you are broke out, the baking soda can burn for a little while because of the salt in it.
I have used this for over a year and haven't smelled bad once. Hope this helps!
 
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dallasllowe replied to dallasllowe's response:
Apply this with your fingertips. Oops, I forgot that!
 
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JDC731 responded:
I will try the arrowroot and baking powder, but have a problem with coconut oil.

Meanwhile, I wash under my arms often and carry the wipette towels in the little packets to use when out in public. However, I do not live in Florida.

Note: Oatmeal baths are soothing when your skin is broken out, dry, and itchy (provided you are not allergic to oatmeal).
Good luck to you!
 
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MichelleWelton replied to dallasllowe's response:
I have been using this for about 6 weeks now and I LOVE IT!! It helped so much. I haven't had a break out since I started using it. It really does help you not smell bad!! LOVE IT LOVE IT & can't say enough good about it!!
 
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Anon_175558 responded:
I've got a similar, though less severe problem. Antiperspirant just makes me itch like mad. And in Chicago, it seems no-one carries ladies' deodorant without antiperspirant. I've found, though, that there are plenty of men's deodorants which are aluminum-free and work really well. Go read some labels and give one a try?
 
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Kmilla responded:
I have a similar problem. I have tried the Toms and it seems to make me smell worse! I feel so embarrassed by how bad it gets. I dont get really sweaty, just the smell. I read some stuff a while back aboit how stage actors use a vodka mix to prevent sweat stains from ruining their clothes. I looked into it and people use this as a deodorant too! Mix 1/4 c vodka with 1/4c distilled water. Add 16 drop of tea tree oil which is a natural antibacterial. If desired you can add some essential oils but i like the smell of the tea tree oil. I put it in mini spray bottle or you can use a cotton ball. This really helps me.
 
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ladypta responded:
try dabbing with wet tea bags, just be aware of stains on your clothes. look up toms? have you tried minted alchol?


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