Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up
Wanting to get Allergy Shots
avatar
An_244732 posted:
I am wanting to get allergy shots after my son is born because I am severly allergic to dust mits and even after taking meds nothing seems to help. Does anyone know how affective they are and how much they cost?
Reply
 
avatar
Aqua14 responded:
You'd have to check with your insurer on how much they might cost for you. For me, they're a very small ($3 to $4) copay, and I get them once a month at this point. However, there is a larger upfront cost for getting the serum, and the copay on that was larger. Still, in my view the investment was worth it.

Personally, allergy shots were the best decision I've made to treat my allergies. I'm starting my 6th year of shots and they have made such a remarkable difference in my life I can't believe it. Just the freedom of not constantly worrying about allergies is worth the cost and hassle of the shots. And I've heard similar success stories from others. You just have to stick with them, because they do take time (years) to completely work. You might see some improvement within the first year but the real improvement will be within 3-5 years.

In addition, there are quite a few avoidance measures you can take with mites -- the allergy encasements on pillows, mattress, box spring, washing bedclothes frequently in very hot water, dehumidifying, taking out carpet in the bedroom, etc. Hopefully you have tried those as well.

Anyway, hope these thoughts help. Take care & good luck. Judy
It's never too late to be what you might have been. ~ George Eliot. A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.
 
avatar
coughy16 responded:
With my insurance, I don't have to pay anything for my shots or my serum, other than when serum runs out, my drs office requires patients to be seen by the doctor in order to get a new batch, so I just have roughy one office visit copay/yr for my shots. If you do have to pay, keep in mind that it will be more expensive in the beginning when you are getting shots weekly and getting new serums a lot. When you get to the once/month dose, it is much less expensive, my serum lasts usually about 10 months I think. Ditto what Judy said about them being the best decision for her. I am a little queasy about needles, but I sucked it up and started the shots, and it has made a huge difference in my life. Also ditto what she said about being patient. Mine took a long time to be effective because I had to increase my dosage more slowly than normal. Hope you feel better!
 
avatar
sgbl88 responded:
Hi,

I have been on allergy shots for four years and hav ehad quite a bit of relief with them.

I have had three different insurance companies and also been self pay in that time. With the first ins company my copay was about $12. The second company covered all immunotherapy expenses - serum and injections. My current company has a co-pay of $14. As a self pay patient I paid $27 after the seflf pay discount. The full price is $32 at my doctor's office.

Do you do sinus rinses? They are very effective in managing allergies.

Feel better and
God bless,

Sonya
Jeremiah 29:11 For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, saith the LORD, thoughts of peace, and not of evil, to give you an expected end... Ye shall seek me, and find [me]
 
avatar
Nicole_2007 replied to Aqua14's response:
Yeah I have tried everything. We have allergetic covers on the pillows, mattresses and box springs. I wash the bedding 2 to 3 times a week, I am constently dusting. Our house has nothing but wood floors. We dont have any carpets. I mean I try to keep everything dusted but living on a farm its hard to keep all my allergies under control. Thats why I am wanting the allergy shots and if it helps me I am thinking my 5 year old might need them some day cause she also has bad allergys I just didnt know if they were expensive. I will be having blue cross blue shield insurance by the time I am able to get the shots so I am hopeing my copay wont be to much for them


Helpful Tips

Tip: safe use of epinephrine auto-injectorsExpert
For patients with allergic diseases that place them at risk for severe allergic reactions or anaphylaxis, epinephrine autoinjectors are an ... More
Was this Helpful?
15 of 27 found this helpful

Related News

There was an error with this newsfeed

Related Drug Reviews

  • Drug Name User Reviews

Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA

FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

For more information, visit the Duke Health Asthma and Allergies Center