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Allergy Development
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An_248357 posted:
I'm 27 years old and have recently moved into a new city/new home in the last two months. In the last month, I have apparently developed an allergy and really need some general advice for my sanity.

First Reaction: After eating a salad from a salad bar in a tiny town in West Texas, my throat swelled, chest tightened, skin felt hot and tingly/turned red all over and itched. I had no medication to take so I just road it out and it calmed down after a few hours. THis was my first issue ever like this. (I have asthma, but it's never been so bad I couldn't deal with it). All I ate before the reaction was some lettuce, black olives, croutons, bacon bits, cheese, an egg white and ranch dressing.

Second Reaction: Midway through lunch at Fazoli's with my husband three days later, I had the same reaction. We went to Target and got Benadryl. A few hours it was gone. I had eaten half a lasagna and some garlic bread.

**In between, I went to an allergist (last Friday actually) and had an allergy test. ALl that popped up was a mild reaction to oats and mold. The doctor believed I had an allergy to sulfites used to preserve certain foods, which is a guessing game in itself. He advised me to take 5000 mg of B12 before I eat and to avoid foods with sulfite preservatives.

Third Reaction: Two houors after my appointment, we went to my favorite mexican restaurant called "Fuzzy's." While sitting in the booth and waiting on our food, I had one chip from my sister-in-law's chip basket (not my best decision) and proceeded to turn bright red and hivey/itchy. Went away in about 45 minutes, probably b/c it was only one chip and I had taken my B12.

Fourth Reaction: Yesterday (Tuesday), I walked into a Mexican restaurant (which I walked into last week) with the rest of my office. I felt my face begin to tingle but tried to ignore it. I walked through the buffet line and got some chicken, refried beans and fresh guac because it was all I trusted. When I got back to the table, I could feel my skin turning hot. I went to the bathroom and basically watched my face/arms/chest turn bright red right in front of me (probably amplified because I was upset). I could feel my chest tighten, so I took my inhaler. My skin as geting worse and worse, so my supervisor took me back to the office. I did not eat. I took 3 teaspoons of children's benadryl, which helped it all go away (about an hour later) and finally went home and went to bed.

Fifth Reaction: This morning, after waking up and getting ready for work, I walked into my kitchen to make my lunch. I felt my face start to tingle and I turned bright red yet again and itchy. I cannot take benadryl because it knocks me out and I need to work. I had no asthmatic reaction or throat swelling, just bright red arms, chest, back and face. It subsided about an hour and a half later.

Needless to say, I'm frustrated and wondering if this has happened to anyone else or if it's normal to play this guessing game with some allergies. I feel absolutely ridiculous.
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Chris_WebMD_Staff responded:
It doesn't sound like these are normal reactions.
I am not an expert, and this is so complicated that anything from anyone here would just be guessing, and that is not what you want for your health.

Please follow up with your doctor and share you concerns and all your symptoms.

Here are some links to information on WebMD that I hope might help.

Food Allergies Slideshow


Also please visit our Allergies Health Center .


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