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Shellfish Allergy Duration/Transferral to Another
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heylucy1913 posted:
I have eaten shrimp and shellfish all my life without any problems. However, Monday afternoon I ingested some shrimp and within the hour began to break out in hives (which at the time I thought were insect bites until they became so numerous). It went from there to horrendous itching, swelling of my chin, lower lip, and right hand, nausea, dizziness, vomiting and finally the onset of anaphylaxis. My husband took me to the ER about 12 hours after the onset, as the conditions did not all present at once, but over a course of time. I was treated for common allergic reactions since I had not been tested and there was no time to do so. I was given medications through IV: Pepcid, Benadryl, Prednisone, and something else for nausea (had to have two doses of that). They also gave me a prescription for Prednisone.

The next day, the nausea and closing of the throat were gone, but the rash had melded into an eczemic like condition. Now it is covering my entire body, even in places I haven't touched -- between toes, in ears, etc. The swelling of the chin, lower lip and hands has also gone away, but my upper lip is now swollen. I saw my doctor today and he diagnosed me with severe shellfish allergy. I was given a prescription for Atarax and ordered to continue the other medications as well. I have now taken three doses for the day and my itching seems a mere bit better, but only a mere bit. I have two questions concerning this newly developed allergy:

1. How long should this rash, the spreading of it, and the extreme itching last?

2. Can I transfer the rash itself by skin contact to another person?

Thanks for any help you can give. I'm new to the allergy world so trying to get all my questions I forgot to ask my doctor answered. I have a newborn grandson and now they won't let me hold him because there is fear I could transfer the rash.
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