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newly diagnosed and scared
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elise_rose posted:
I am 26, female, and generally healthy. I have never had any allergies in my life. Recently, I had a sudden anaphalactic episode that landed me in the ER under life-threatening conditions. I have been tested for general food alergens with no success in discovering the cause. It may have been a prescription strength ibiprofin but im not even sure i took one that morning. I have been diagnosed with panic disorders in the past and had my anxiety under control for the first time in my life- and then this. I have literally been terrified ever since. I feel like my face never stops itching especially my eye and my hives never went away after the attack a month ago. I am having alot of trouble being able to differentiate an unknown allergen and its symptoms with the fear and panic driven symptoms (nausea, anxiety, etc). Also, I felt like my allergy doctor seemed like my panic was ridiculous and treated my questions with a patronizing boredom (unfortunately as a broke college student he is my only option). Is my fear justified? Is there more I can do to quell the panic? How do I KNOW if I am going into anaphalaxis again-- do i wait until its so obvious there is no other choice, i read online that early action at the first symptom is key. Clearly I need help here, I will; be going back to my schools clinic when it reopens after winter break... but until then...This is a terrible situation for anyone and I wonder how others manage not to live in constant fear.
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