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Bean allergy
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scribe_stone posted:
I posted this in the asthma area by accident so this is a new attempt to get help. Sorry for the mix-up.

My wife seems to be allergic to beans, but not all beans. While she can eat peas and green beans, she cannot eat wax beans (though they "look" like a pale green bean. All other beans are off limits. Soy beans are bad too, except that she can eat certain products containing soy products. She can eat peauts and drink coffee.

Questions: What enzyme or protein or other nasty bit is causing her violent nausea, cramping, vomiting, etc.? How do we determine what part of these legumes is the culprit? Why would a green bean be ok but a wax bean be deadly? Why are some soy products ok but not others? Is there a supplement to counteract their effect?

I am a desperate husband that stands helplessly by when my wife is "beaned" and incapacitated. HELP!
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momofdd75 responded:
Interesting about your wife. I, too, am allergic to beans but I do fine with green and wax beans but do not do well with legumes such as pinto beans, kidney beans, etc. Occasionally things with soy get me as well, but not all, just like your wife. What's interesting is that this just started a few years ago. When I was pregnant I would eat bean burritos like crazy, with no symptoms.

You mentioned that your wife gets nausea and cramps, does she get any other symptoms? My lips and the inside of my mouth tend to swell and I have heartburn like symptoms.

Please let me know if you find anything out . I live in the southwest and love mexican food.
 
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dfwk98 responded:
My 16 year-old son has had 3 episodes in the past 3 - 4 months where he has gotten violently ill. It wasn't until the last episode this past Sunday that we were able to figure out that it may have something to do with beans. The first and second episode he had bean burittos and this last time he had baked beans. It begins within a few hours of eating them and he'll feel nausious. Soon he's throwing up and writhing in pain on the floor. The pain is so bad he has thought he may die. He gets hot, then cold and the severe pain takes hours and hours to go away. The first time this happened he told me he couldn't feel his lips but didn't mention it this last time. Is this an allergy or and intollerence to beans? And why did it just come on now? He's eaten beans all his life why now are they causing him such discomfort? Besides avoiding the trigger foods, is there anything you do that works?
 
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frogst responded:
I too have been diagnosed with a bean allergy. I had a severe anaphylactic reaction after eating kidney beans. I had been eating beans my whole life prior to this incident. My husband used my daughter's Epipen Jr on me ( she is allergic to peanuts ) and saved my life.
 
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pega84 responded:
I really believe this and its funny to me because I have ate beans all my life until 2 years ago...I had a blood disorder and when I had my first allergic reaction to Iron....but supplement it with natural iron straight from food....but this weekend I ate beans twice hehehe like good bean lover and the next day I woke up with bad stomach sensations and with red patches all over my body....took some benadryl but it didn't work I ended up in the hospital and now I am under treatment to see if it will go away....scary but true...didn't believe it at first.
 
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An_190967 replied to momofdd75's response:
I just figured out I have an allergy to pinto beans, I suspected but now know for sure. Not only do I have a server stomach and mouth reaction but I have a serious issue with my esophagus as a result. I can eat NO hard beans in any form without issues. It took me years to figure out. My daughter when she was growing up, I took notice that she would vomit whenever she ate hard beans, like Pinto. So we just stopped feeding them to her. So is this allergy hereditary ? I don't seam to have symptoms with coffee, green beans or peanuts Why ? However I do with cashews ? Just seams odd ???
 
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SmithsGirl replied to An_190967's response:
So hear the experiences of other people who are allergic to beans. I hated beans as a kid and refused to eat them except string beans. Then at 27 I decided I was going to be healthy in grad school and eat more beans, particularly red beans. I couldn't understand why I would wake up at 4 in the morning doubled over with cramps, with sweats. I went to the doctor and I was given an ultrasound to see if I had a kidney stone. I did not. At no point did anyone suggest I had a food allergy. I decided I was lactose intolerant and started drinking soy milk.
It was not till I was doing a story with the allergy and asthma clinic here in Bermuda - I'm a journalist that I mentioned my problem. A very bored doctor said its a food intolerance give her a blood test. Turned out kidney beans were a four. Eggs were a three. I'd been making myself sicker with the soy milk.
What makes me made is that I went to several different doctors about my stomach pains and no one suggested I had a food intolerance. The egg problem seems to have gotten a bit better in the last year or two. I can't down a muffin or piece of cake with no symptoms. Its funny someone mentioned the soy. I can eat that too with no obvious problems.
 
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crazybaconeater73 replied to dfwk98's response:
There is nothing you can do to remove the allergy completely. However, I went to a chiropracter and she tested me with different types of beans. She gave me a vitamin that really reduced the intensity of my reactions.
 
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BradsSteph responded:
I have complete sympathy for your wife as I have suffered from bbean allergy since I was 12 years old, now I'm 28 years old. When we were younger beans were part of our daily meals. I don't remember ever having problems with them when I was younger. We went a period of a few years not eating beans and one day, at age 12, I ate a chilli dog because I was craving it so badly. Next thing I know my throat is closing up, my lips are swollen, blue and itchy and my skin felt like it was on fire. I really had no clue that I was allergic to what I had eaten. I just brushed it off as possibly bad food. Months later I tried again only with chilli and the same thing happened. I had to be taken to the emergency room and observed, because of course they thought I was just having an asthma attack. No asthma attack ever effected me that way. We did a follow up with our family doctor the next day and we did the food trials to see what I was allergic to, sure enough I'm allergic to ALL beans. I can eat green beans no problem but I do have some issues with peas, not sure if that's related at all. Anyways to jump to my point of responding to your post. I went to our local allergy and asthma clinic to have tests run, unfortunately they couldn't run the tests because I have a severe sensitivity to any type of steroid. The procedure consists of having small, almost miniscule shots administered on your back to check your reactions to known allergens. Yes there is something that can control her allergies and that would be to go to the allergy and asthma center and be tested so they know the right steroid shot to give her. It would be well worth while since she seems to have reactions to other things as well. I have other food allergies I still haven't even figured out yet, I just know the symptoms of an allergic reaction or sensitivity but can't exactly pin point what all irritates me. Going to the allergy and asthma center would help her narrow down all her allergies, and then they can recommend the appropriate steroid shot for her to take to keep it under control. I feel her pain. I can't hardly eat out because most all restuarants have beans readily available on their cook line and even the slightest exposure sends me into a severe reaction. I hope I have been somewhat helpful. I too suffer from some pretty serious food allergies, most of which I haven't been able to identify. I wish you both the best of luck and I hope you can get in touch with an allergy and asthma center.
 
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deel449 replied to crazybaconeater73's response:
what vitamin did she give you to reduce the intensity of your baked bean allergy? I never used to have problems but once I was placed on blood pressure meds and cholestrol meds I seemed to develop an allergy to baked beans. Peas and String beans are okay. I've been afraid to try kidney beans, even though I've eaten them without problems for years. This is an issue now as my doctor recommended I eat more foods with fiber, she says maybe it's not the beans but the preservative they use in the cans.
 
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ellejayess replied to BradsSteph's response:
There is a method of testing for food allergens which uses a lock of your hair sent to a lab, instead of the traditional method of all those little shots!
It gives the intensity of the allergy/intolerance and the clinician makes suggestions based on the results.
 
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G6PD_Deficient responded:
Your wife may be one of the 400 Million people who cannot be vegan or tolerate beans. She should get checked for G6PD and try to eat nutritious whole foods instead of the processed junk.
 
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arizona74mom replied to dfwk98's response:
This sounds like anaphylaxis and I suggest you all look at the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis website and not eat/feed these foods. Gastrointestinal issues, i.e. Nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps and diarrhea are signs of anaphylaxis. I am not a doctor but I have my own food allergy problems and this is NOT to be fooled around with. It's a potential life and death matter. I believe the website is www.faan.org


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