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allergic... to running?
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ericksonf posted:
I can't assume that no one has ever heard of this type of thing, but here goes... I try working out as much as possible. Perhaps like many people who exercise regularly, eat healthy, but sit at a desk all day, there seems to be little that can be done to keep the (even a small one) "tire" from forming as we get older. I do weight training and cardio at least 5 times a week. I've recently tried to put running back on the chart after years of not doing so. However, just as before (which is why I stopped running in the 1st place) I've noticed that (most times) after I finish my run, I have a serious sneeze attack. I mean like uncontrollable-eyes burning-can't catch my breath sneeze attack... and that's running inside! It has been known to happen in the middle of a run, also. Now, after using almost any other types of cardio (elliptical machine, stairmaster, etc.) I'm perfectly fine. However, I got the same reaction from rowing. I really like the benefits that running can give, but I can't function after the sneezing starts. In extreme cases, it's difficult to do much else for the remainder of the day due to my nose running like a faucet. This didn't always happen (back in the Army days), but it seems to have surfaced over the past 7 years or so. I don't know if it would be allergies, but I could be wrong. I would just like to know what, if anything, could be done to run in the confidence of knowing that I'm not sealing the fate of another day...
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Aqua14 responded:
There are a group of conditions wherein exercise induces allergic or related symptoms. Exercise-induced hives are fairly common (see post on Exercise & Fitness board: boards.webmd.com/webx?THDX@@.89a7de09!thdchild=.89a7de09). Exercise-induced asthma is extremely common. It sounds as though you may have exercise-induced rhinitis (rhinitis being the medical term for inflammation of the nose).

Here's an abstract of a very recent professional article on these syndromes: www.ingentaconnect.com/content/mksg/all/2008/00000063/00000008/art00001

The culprit behind exercise-induced hives and rhinitis is histamine, best known as the allergy chemical. However, histamine is released in the body for many normal, non-allergic functions. Typical symptoms due to too much histamine include itching, sneezing, and runny nose. One could speculate that because running and rowing are very intense aerobic activities, your body produces a lot of histamine at those times, as opposed to the more moderately aerobic stairmaster and elliptical sessions.

What you could do is to try taking a non-drowsy OTC antihistamine like Zyrtec about an hour before running or rowing, to see if it helps prevent your symptoms. (I prefer Zyrtec, as it has a fast onset of action and is stronger than Claritin.) You may have to take it daily for about a week to ensure that the antihistamine reaches maximum effectiveness. And antihistamines work best if taken preventatively, so taking them before the onset of your symptoms is a better idea than taking them after you start sneezing. If the antihistamine helps, it is very likely that the reaction is histamine mediated.

A consultation with an allergist would be a good idea, to get allergy tested and also to give you information on how best to manage this condition.

Hopefully this information helps you out. Take care & good luck. Judy
 
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ltatun responded:
I am suffering from the same problem and was wondering if you found anything that helps? I won't give up running but may have to take more time off from work being so sick from this. My symptoms don't always show up after every run. Sometimes it will last for 12 hours and sometimes 3-4 days (like now!). Hard to function when I can't stop sneezing and my eyes and nose won't stop running. My symptoms usually are only on one side but I have had both sides bother me. Any help would be appreciated...
 
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ltatun responded:
I just wanted to post my symptoms more clearly... After moderate aerobic activity such as running or cycling, I sometimes experience allergic symptoms such as sneezing, runny nose, tearing eyes, congestion. This happens about 40% of the time post workout. It can start right away, usually starts after I hit the shower, or I have even had symptoms begin 24 hours after a run. The symptoms can last for a few hours or up to 3-4 days. It gets so bad that I can't go to work. I have seen an allergy MD for several years and tried MANY medications-nasal sprays, eye drops, Singulair and the like, OTC allergy medication, inhalers. Nothing works. My doctor finally said he couldn't help me. The ENT doctor couldn't help me. A naturopathic doctor said it was a lacrimal duct spasm causing non-allergic rhinitis. I tried calcium carbonate for a short time but not sure if it helped because I moved and wasn't able to get a refill. If there is anyone out there that can help, I sure would appreciate it!!!
 
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Gotskin responded:
Try running inside on a treadmill and see if the same thing happens. My dad was strongly allergic to grass. Especially fresh cut grass. You could have common weed allergies and when you run your are breathing more heavily causing you to inhale more of the allergens.
 
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lakejoey replied to ltatun's response:
Please tell me someone helped you out more than this ... I'm dying here. I have the exact same symptoms. It's almost immediately after running, and often lasts for days. Sneezing, itchy, watery eyes, nose running nonstop--and it's whether I run inside or out. Does the antihistamine work? This is really putting a damper on my running....
Thanks!
 
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mollyrunning replied to lakejoey's response:
have serched the internet and find alot of people with the same problem. no one seems to have a sulotion. i have tried all the antihistamine...they take the edge off but deffinitly not a cure. i have just had to back off my running and do about half of what i would like to:( wish someone would offer something!
 
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maryelizabethms responded:
This has been happening to me all week. Did you ever figure out what it was? I have been a runner for years, but recently took 2 months off. I started back this week and have had sneezing attacks every night after my run on the treadmill. It happens about 5 minutes after and lasts for hours. What gives?
 
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Ryguy16 responded:
I have this problem also, it started about 4 years ago and only happens when I overexert myself. Usually running, rowing, or playing basketball. At first I thought it was an allergy to dust or somthing in the gym or basketball court, or I picked up a cold from someone. But it would come on so quick, like in the shower after working out on the rowing machine. It is a very miserable time to say the least and I knew something else was going on. I did find a cure that works for me! I don't take drugs so Zyrtec and Claritin where out. I knock the symptoms out completely or greatly reduce them if I immediately, like after the 1st sneeze, run cold water over my head and face. My attack has everything to do with the heat generated in my body and I believe it ramps up the production of histamine. I will run the coldest water I can find over my head and splash it in my face and up my nose constantly until my temperature has dropped and the symptoms seem to subside. I even have ice packs ready to drop my core temperature immediately after a strenuous workout. The best are the gel packs to wrap around my neck and forehead. It works people! Histamine is the problem and for some reason when my core is extremely heated it triggers the production of extra histamine, the only way to stop the production is to drop the core temp back to normal levels as soon as possible. Try it!
 
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Ryguy16 replied to maryelizabethms's response:
I did find a cure that works for me! I don't take drugs so Zyrtec and Claritin where out. I knock the symptoms out completely or greatly reduce them if I immediately, like after the 1st sneeze, run cold water over my head and face. My attack has everything to do with the heat generated in my body and I believe it ramps up the production of histamine. I will run the coldest water I can find over my head and splash it in my face and up my nose constantly until my temperature has dropped and the symptoms seem to subside. I even have ice packs ready to drop my core temperature immediately after a strenuous workout. The best are the gel packs to wrap around my neck and forehead. It works! Histamine is the problem and for some reason when my core is extremely heated it triggers the production of extra histamine, the only way to stop the production is to drop the core temp back to normal levels as soon as possible. Yea I know people think Im crazy when I'm in the locker room bathroom running cold water over my head with ice packs on but its better then sneezing with a runny nose for 2 or 3 days. Hopefully this works for you!
 
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Ryguy16 replied to Ryguy16's response:
Sorry, didn't mean to post it twice. The first one looked like it didn't take. Oh well!
 
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cheers321 responded:
I've got this problem as well, & it manifests as a pretty constant runny nose soon after I start any kind of workout (that's even somewhat vigorous). My nose also runs whenever I eat (anything more than 2-3 bites; not only hot / spicy foods, but cold salads = anything) & in cold weather. I've done fairly extensive research online, & in my case it's nonallergic rhinitis (aka, "vasomotor rhinitis"). Cause seems uncertain, but the single most effective treatment seems to be Atrovent nasal (generically known as Ipratropium Bromide). Works well, but has a short half-life (doesn't work for very long). Loratadine (Claritin) helps, & I also just got a prescription for Flonase (but not sure yet of effectiveness / side effects).
 
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cheers321 responded:
I've got this problem as well, & it manifests as a pretty constant runny nose soon after I start any kind of workout (that's even somewhat vigorous). My nose also runs whenever I eat (anything more than 2-3 bites; not only hot / spicy foods, but cold salads = anything) & in cold weather. I've done fairly extensive research online, & in my case it's nonallergic rhinitis, aka vasomotor rhinitis. The single most effective treatment seems to be Atrovent nasal (generically known as Ipratropium Bromide). Works well, but has a short half life (doesn't work for very long). Loratadine (Claritin) helps, & I also just got a prescription for Flonase (but not sure yet of effectiveness / side effects).
 
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Kmoore1286 replied to Ryguy16's response:
I actually just got finished with a run outside, was totally fine throughout the run and right when I stepped inside, SNEEZE ATTACK! My sneeze attacks are accompanied with a runny nose and watery eyes. So, since I've had this happen more than once, which believe me if enough, I went ahead and did a little research myself. I found there is a disease called Rhinitis. Now, there are three categories: 1.Allergic, 2. Infectious and 3. Non-allergic (Vasomotor). Sometimes Rhinitis can be a mixture of allergic and non-allergic if you have allergies of any kind. If you research this, I think you'll find this to be pretty spot on to what we have. * I did take your advice though before I self diagnosed myself and it did seem to help a little, so thanks for that!* Hope this helps
 
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Viking_Paul replied to Kmoore1286's response:
Hi! I'm really thrilled to have found this community where you discuss a problem I've had for several years without any explanation. In my case I do a lot of cross-country skiing in the winter. I never have any problems while excersising but afterwards I occasionally start sneezing. Once that happens, I continue in the same way you describe. The last time this happened to me was on Saturday and now, three days later, I'm still not 100% well. My own conclusion is that the trigger always start by a tickling in my nose and if I then just sneeze once, the bad process starts and cannot be stopped. I've tried to understand what makes this happen and come to the conclusion that it has to do with my body temperature going down quickly after I have stopped excersising. Therefore, I always try to get indoors as quickly as possible and the get rid of all the sweaty clothes and jump into a hot shower. To some extent this is the opposite of Ruguy16's remedy to put ice on the head and neck. I must try that I see what happens. I must add that I'm puzzled why it is so difficult to find professional people who know anything about this. The discussion about having a runny nose while exercising (EIR) is one thing but what others and I describe here is something completely differnt (although the nose is a common favtor). I've always had a running nose while exercising but it's not been any problem as the symptoms disappear right after the exercise. The sneezing-induced problem, however, is much much worse!


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