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allergic to aerosols?
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Snagabax posted:
I don't even know if this Exsists, I searched a Few places on the Internet and didn't Find too much. I think I might have a small Allergy to Certain Aerosol Sprays.

We used to have this Fabric Lysol Spray at work and one day someone sprayed it and When I Breathed it in I would just start coughing and I would have to literally Run away because I could not Breathe and stop coughing. I noticed it was so bad that at times the coughing would almost cause me to throw up. I noticed I am sensitive to Most Aerosols but not to the extreme. I have this Fabreeze Spray in my bathroom, and I got a good wiff of it yesterday and after that and today I been coughing here and there but I do feel my lungs a little inflamed.

Could I really be allergic to Aeorsols? If so what do I do for it beside the obvious stay away?
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Aqua14 responded:
It's probably not an allergy, but rather the spray is extremely irritating to your lungs. It's a more common reaction in those who have asthma or other lung diseases, but I'd imagine those kind of sprays can be pretty irritating to the lungs of people without lung disease.

Really the only thing to do is to avoid using such sprays in your home and workplace. (You can talk to your employer about getting rid of the Lysol, since you have the legal right to a safe workplace.) It's a good idea to avoid such sprays anyway, because there's been some recent research linking household cleaning sprays to the development of asthma.

If you choose to keep using them, then make sure that someone else sprays them and that you are far away from where they are being sprayed, so you don't directly inhale them. Otherwise you're just damaging your lungs.

Hopefully these thoughts help. Take care & good luck. Judy
 
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Snagabax replied to Aqua14's response:
Naw I don't Have Asthma, and I run 4 Times a Week. I don't Smoke or anything. So it's not that and my reactions arn't normal reactions though, more extreme then most people. I don't Spray anything, but I can't help if other people spray something
 
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sgbl88 replied to Snagabax's response:
It could be Reactive Airway Disease. That is similar to asthma but not exactly the same. Symptoms are similar though. Either way, it is good that you have learned to not use spray products.

Sonya
 
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MySilverLining replied to sgbl88's response:
It is possible to have Asthma & not know it because you don't have the "classic" signs & symptoms; you also might have R.A.D. It could simply be that your body (lungs) no longer tolerate certain things because THEY AREN'T GOOD FOR ANYONE!!! You think that just because something is sold legally it is safe--well, it's not true! There is little or no testing done on the majority of these things; there is no stringent guideline they have to follow to use a certain ingredient & sell the product w/ that in it. Everyone needs to learn that no one in the corporate sector is safeguarding our health; we all need to do the research & change the environment we live in. And don't just have someone else who doesn't have the same bad reaction do it for you--that still puts it in your own little environment, & in the world at large to harm other people!
MySilverLining
 
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jesuswon responded:
You may be chemically sensitive?
 
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wonderchick06 responded:
I know how you feel, I get the same thing, and the problem is I have family that likes to spray lysol into the air when it stinks in the room for reasons I don't really know how to say tactfully. I don't know the solution, but I do know that I had a germaphobic speech teacher that would alow me to sit outside of the classroom because she would spray in the air and afterwards I couldn't breath. I don't cough so much as I get to the point where I just can't brethe
 
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LINDAJOYADAMS responded:
For many of us it is not allergies. We are chemically sensitive and the result is medically called: Toxic effect and the chemicals can inflame the entire body and cause asthma exacerbations and I've even been diagnosed with leukopenia.' I'm not a doctor; just a patient for 21 years since a horrendous toxic exposure that left me with lifetime progressive injuries. To come into contact with several chemicals causes inflammation. Its like one put my mucous membrane on a hot burning stove!! I can see why this article may have been pulled. There are a new group of patients now suffering from a bad toxic effect: those hired to disburse the toxic chemicals to get rid of the oil spill in the gulf. Now its reported; the workers have gone to court to get permission to even use respirator mask. Is there a 'dress code'? Why isn't a worker allowed to protect their health and life. I returned to work for awhile and when I reacted to the low level chemicals in the 'modern office environment' my doctor wrote a prescription for a "mask" but without employer assistance; i got the wrong one and was suffering and then laser printers were brought in in 6/92 and i spent weeks recovering from an acute exacerbation. Then Mine Safety at OSHA told me what i needed: A respirator mask with a filter for organic vapors and acid gases and a hepa filter. If you are chemically sensitive or have reactive airway disease: you will find much discrimination in our current system. Liability insurers for the new group of injured workers and those who live around the disbursed chemicals who will try to get medcial care paid for will find they are in for a " fight of their life' and federal agencies 'siding with big business against the injured and you doctors will be placed in a horrendous 'squeeze play." its time for protection of our medical personnel against such intimidation and harassment as its been known for decades that such injuries are physically real and treatment is available and known. This same 'back lash" against those already suffering from similar injuries occurred after 9/11 when our government ignored and refused to assist in protecting those who were being exposed to the toxic fires in New York City. Those like us; should expect more of the same unless we truly do have a new administration in Washington, DC that really does believe in protection of the environment and that includes caring for the people injured from environmental disasters and the feeble and improper attempts to solve. You may end up as an oxygen patient from day one of your injury. if so, it may allow you to continue a productive life doing some kind of work. Often, with the 'rationed care' on place this treatment isn't provided until heart, kidney and other damage is detectable and the disease progresses. Why shouldn't the best care be made available at the beginning and preserve the best possible life and outcome.
When one like me enters a place and breathes the aerosols which often contain formaldehyde one of the worst offending chemicals for me: I have no choice but to leave as soon as possible and suffer until the inflammation passes. Extra cortisone steroids, medications and plenty of purified water seem to be the only help. pray for justice for those newly injured and those who suffer daily from our polluted environment. {There are those who get like this gradually according to many scientific studies and that raise the issue of whether these chemicals should ever be used in aerosols at all.> Linda Joy Adams
 
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Briaana replied to LINDAJOYADAMS's response:
I was having the same problem at work; due to perfume sensitivities and chemicals sensitivities. I became so sick, I went to HR after being on all kinds of medications and having to take time off from work, and was told by HR " that they would not change policy for one person"; even though I informed them that at least three others were also suffering with their health and afraid to go to them about it. Long story short, Since I was OPS , I am out of a job and the ones that wear heavy doses of the perfumes (some also OPS) and spray all kinds of freshners for patient smells, are still working! Funny part is the State educates people in the communities on smoking and promotes a Smoke free facilities, yet they don't think its important to educate the public on what these chemicals are doing to them! Some of these perfumes/chemicals are so strong that the smell of them stays for hours, yet it is my problem .....not theirs! I don't normally wish bad for people ....but I only wish for some of those who are so inconsiderate to others health ....that they feel just once how it feels like to loose your breath and close up from something that can be avoided.
 
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sgbl88 replied to Briaana's response:
Briaana,

I hope that Judy jumps in on this one. She has some resources that will help you. Mainly, asthma is classified as a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Any employer MUST make reasonable accomodations for their employees with asthma to have a safe working environment. That does mean changing policy for one person. Many companies are now adopting fragrance free policies as a result.

I certainly do understand what you mean. I really do wish that people could experience what I deal with on a daily basis for just five minutes.

Good luck finding a new job.

Sonya
Jeremiah 29:11 For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, saith the LORD, thoughts of peace, and not of evil, to give you an expected end... Ye shall seek me, and find [me]


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