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Sinus problems related to acid reflux?
a2zebra posted:
Hi all! I saw an ENT yesterday after suffering painfully congested sinuses for about 2 months. I had a CT scan done, and was told everything is normal except for my turbinates being pretty enlarged. The ENT doctor suggested I have a heat turbinate reduction, but I haven't really seen much good news about the results of the surgery. I've heard that in about 50% of cases, symptoms recur within a year to 5 years and surgery is needed again. Can you give me your thoughts on this procedure?

Also, the doctor didn't really look much at my history and diagnosed me with acid reflux. He thinks this is causing a lot of my post nasal drip problems as well as drainage sticking in the back of my throat. I did read somewhere last night that acid reflux may affect the turbinates, too, but I'm a little uncomfortable taking reflux medication after the doctor not having much proof that this is what would be causing my issues. I don't have frequest heartburn, but the more I think about it, I do burp a lot and catch the hiccups often, and sometimes I feel pressure in my chest above my stomach. What do you all think? Should I try lifestyle changes first (like reducing coffee, acids, spicy foods, fatty foods, etc etc)? Or would it just help me heal faster to take the omeprazole he prescribed? Or should I ask for him to test me for a reflux disorder before I do anything?

Just so you know where I stand with prescriptions, I currently take zyrtec, wellbutrin, buspar, and yaz. I will start Nasonex tonight since the new doctor just prescribed it yesterday. I've been eating about 2 cloves of fresh garlic daily to help ward off sinus infections and drinking apple cider vinegar to help as well.
deluxehd responded:
Hello a2zebra,

I am not familiar with turbinates. But you can have acid reflux without the heartburn and usual symptoms. It is referred to as silent acid reflux. A diet change would certainly be a good idea. As long as your dr and/or pharmacist say the omeprazole is okay to take with your other meds, it's worth a try. Something that may be very helpful would be a sinus rinse. I use NeilMed bottle and it has made a world of difference for me. It can be bought at most pharmacies.

Hope you are feeling better.
Aqua14 responded:
Acid reflux can definitely cause problems with your throat, sinuses and nasal tissue, leading to postnasal drip, coughing, stuffiness, etc. I also had these kind of problems a few years ago and after being on several different types of antibiotics had a CT of my sinuses, which my allergist thought indicated acid reflux. Sure enough, a trial of acid reflux medications helped a lot.

Before you go to the extreme measure of surgery, it would seem worth a trial of the reflux lifestyle changes plus the omeprazole (brand name Prilosec). However, know that one acid reflux med might work better for you than others, so you might have to try a few before you find one that works best. And talk to your doctor about taking the omeprazole at night, which is when reflux tends to get worse. Another lifestyle change worth doing is not eating within 2 hours of bedtime, and elevating the head of your bed. Oh, and you can take Tums, which will also increase your calcium intake.

Also, the Nasonex will help. I agree with Debbie's suggestion to add the saline sinus rinse. It might help you to do the sinus rinse in the morning to get rid of any acid that may have refluxed up during the night. At least that helps me cope with this.

Hopefully these thoughts help. Take care & good luck. Judy
It's never too late to be what you might have been. ~ George Eliot. A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.
NeilMed replied to deluxehd's response:
Dear Deluxehd,

Greetings from NeilMed!

Thanks for recommending NeilMed Sinus Rinse. We would like to hear from you about your experience with NeilMed Sinus Rinse. We are pleased to offer you a NeilMed Sinus Rinse kit for trial so that you can share with us, your views on the product. Please write to us at with your address and reference to this conversation so that we can send you a NeilMed product for trial.

NeilMed Webmaster

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