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cjh1203 posted:
Just saw this article on CNN's site. A drug used to treat a type of skin cancer has been found to reverse Alzheimer's in mice. It may not pan out for people with Alzheimer's but, for now, it looks like a promising possibility.
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LokRobster responded:
interesting - it's always cool when a development has applications outside of its original target.
 
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Judith L London, PhD responded:
Hi cjh 1203,

Although that drug, bexarotene, is FDA approved for use in advancing skin cancer, many trials have to be initiated to determine whether it will work in Alzheimer's. The dosage, in particular, needs to be established for that purpose.

A certain amount of beta amyloid is needed to maintain the brain. It is not clear whether the plaque accumulation that develops in Alzheimer's is a cause or a byproduct of the disease.

Another issue is that the patent on bexatotene will expire in a year so that many pharmaceutical companies may shy away from testing a drug that soon will be available in its generic form at a much lower price.

Here's hoping that the Alzheimer's Assn. will sponsor trials,

Judy
 
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2010guardian replied to Judith L London, PhD's response:
Thanks for explaining this. The cure for AD won't come in my lifetime, but maybe in my grandchildrens lifetime. That would be great!

Kthy


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