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my mom has alzheimers
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Anon_30608 posted:
hi all, ive been in this community chat before....just wanna say hi having a hard time with my mom , she is progressing slowly but surely with this disease and esp these last two yrs we as a family have seen her decline...its like the lights are on but noone is home...we noticed that after she had her teeth pulled that were bad and got denures she was worse...weird but thought id put that one out there incase there is some correlation.....she is only 67 and was diagnosed bout 4 yr ago.....seen some signs before hand though...anyone try gingko for memory? omegas?b12? aminos? acupuncture? even reflexology?
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Judith L London, PhD responded:
It's so hard to see your Mom getting worse. Dental procedures or any medical challenge often exacerbate symptoms.

Research shows that Gingko doesn't help. Having about 3 cups of coffee per day, preferably in the am, might help since studies on normal participants show that caffeine may delay the onset by up to 2 years. So, perhaps caffeine may help even now. Other studies indicate that coconut oil may help - see my 'Tips' - but the oil has lots of triclycerides, which may not be good for her. Omega 3's in general are good for the brain - but it may not be so effective when Alzheimer's has begun. Physical and mental stimulation may improve her quality of life.

Check out Aricept or Namenda with her physician - it might slow down deterioration. Keep checking with the Alzheimer's Assn for the latest information.

Most importantly, know that there still is a lot left in in your Mom's brain - and you can still connect with her and have a meaningful relationship.

Join a support group - it makes a difference.

Our thoughts are with you,
Judy
 
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stacey1977 responded:
Hi,
My mother is 66 and recently diagnosed with Alzheimer's. She just had dental work done over the passed few months. She has a gum graft and a tooth removed by an oral surgeon. I consulted the neurologist about all the appointments that kept creeping up on us. He suggested that we prioritize what had to be done. Getting a septic tooth is bad, but so is some of the medication used to help with pain. I focused my energy with her teeth. Here, I spoke with the dentist and asked what needed to be done first and then space the appointments out. She struggled the most with the tooth extraction. She appears to have bounced back. So, my experience with this is that you need to be realistic on what needs to be done. Maintaining good health is important, but we also do not want to overwhelm their systems with procedures and medications that can cause further deterioration of their cognitive abilities. As for the alternative remedies and nutrition questions, I have not explored this. I am interested in anything that can help my mother maintain her cognitive abilities.
 
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cjh1203 replied to stacey1977's response:
Hi Stacey.

I'm so sorry about your mom's diagnosis. It's bad enough at any age, but she is so young.

It sounds like you're doing such a great job of taking care of your mother and making sure things are not too traumatic for her. I'm glad she's doing well after the work on her teeth.

Is she taking any medications for her Alzheimer's?

Here's an article about nutrition for Alzheimer's patients.

There is also some evidence that coconut oil can help slow the progress of Alzheimer's. Here's a previous discussion about it.

The Alzheimer's Association site has tons of useful information. There is likely an Alzheimer's Association support group in your area, which could be invaluable to you. Even if you do lots of reading and research, there's nothing like talking to people who have been or are going through a lot of the same things you are. You can learn a lot just by sharing stories, frustrations and tips.

A couple of the big things to remember, especially as your mother's disease progresses, are that people with Alzheimer's need structure in their days, and that crowds and new places can be overwhelming and frightening. Your mother likely isn't at that point now, if she was just diagnosed.

One of the most important things you can do for your mother is to take care of yourself and be sure you get some breaks, and time to do nice things for yourself. Caregiving can take over your life pretty easily, and you need to consider your own health and well-being so you can be a help to your mother.

I hope you'll keep posting. It's been pretty quiet here, but you'll always get a response.

Best wishes to you and your mom.

Carol