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Husband is diagnosed
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steviesmom11 posted:
Morning, I am new to this forum. My husband was diagnosed 2 years ago with Early Onset, after a couple years of progressive testing. He is still high functioning, although he does not drive. I work 4 10 hour shifts and have Thursdays and the weekends off with him. He recently started an adult daycare program in the mornings, 2x a week, on the advice of his social worker through his doctor's office...as an attempt to socialize more. I drop him off and then pick him up on my lunch break to go home. Most of the patients at this daycare are further along in their disease. He told me (after 5 visits) that he is not interested in attending right now and he knows that the daycare is a sign of things to come. The center wants him to keep going in more of a "volunteer" role. He is not interested and said he may look at it again in the fall. I feel like I'm betraying him by talking to the Center's director about this but he wants to be home in the summer to work on his garden and other small projects.Should I let him stay home or keep trying to convince him to go? Thoughts on this?
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davedsel2 responded:
Hello and welcome.

IMHO, the center would be a good experience for your husband. However, if he does not want to go and is adamant about staying home, it would be better for now if he does stay home. I'm sure you have done research and know that as the disease progresses it is more difficult to reason with the patient. You can continue to gently encourage your husband to go to the center or do other things he is able outside the home, but realize he may be more comfortable just staying at home.

I will be praying for you and your family as you go through this journey.
Please click on my username or avatar picture to read my story.

Blessings,

-Dave
 
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Judith L London, PhD responded:
Hi,

You are wise to have arranged for the day program. It looks like he gave it a try and got upset about the future. He may need to talk about it. He might benefit from an Alzheimer's support group where these issues can be aired. One may be available where you live. Check with www.alz.org or call 800-272-3900. Consider a support group for yourself as well - even though you work so hard so many hours of the week.

Now is the time to discuss this illness with him, and find out about his wishes of the future. Counselors who help this are available at the Alzheimer's Assn. or other non-profit organizations knowledgeable about Alzheimer's.

Keep up your strength,
Judy


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