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Resources for Alzheimer's Individuals
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Judith L London, PhD posted:
  1. Alzheimer's Assn. www.alz.org 800-272-3900.
  2. Local Veterans Administration (you don't have to be in the military).
  3. The Azheimer's Cafe - a new group cropping up in communities.
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2010guardian responded:
When my husband talked to the social worker at VA, he was told that they would try to help in anything that was needed. He offered safety bars for the tub and shower. (we already had these). He offered cane, walker, etc. and then he told my husband that they needed to take care of me, the caregiver. My husband seemed confused, but the social worker said that they could arrange for someone to come and stay with him while I went to the store or just a break. They he said, "We have to take care of her." I asked if the people who came would be veterans and he said, 'probably not, we work through other organizations.'

Are you aware of anything else that they might do? I was wondering if they might have "end care" in a nursing home.

Kathy
 
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cjh1203 replied to 2010guardian's response:
Hi Kathy.

If your husband's doctor thinks that your husband has less than six months left, he would qualify for hospice care, which can be done at home, in the hospice house or in a nursing facility. They are a godsend and take care of absolutely everything. It's something your doctor would need to arrange.

Here is more information about hospice care.

I know several people who have used hospice care, including a good friend, my uncle and my father-in-law, and it made a sad and difficult situation so much easier for the patients and the families.

Carol
 
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2010guardian replied to cjh1203's response:
Hi Carol, yes, I'm aware of Hospice. We are a long way from that. My daughter was concerned about when (and if) my husband should get violent and abuse me. She said I would then need to put him in a nursing home.

She suggested I get long-term health care. I think I've waited too long for that since we are in our mid 70's. I think it will be too expensive. However, I have contacted a company to get information. Also, I'm concerned about having to sell my home in order to pay a nursing home. I will do whatever is necessary. I really intend on keeping him home if possible.
I normally don't think that far ahead, but by reading about everyone elses problems, I feel I must be knowledgable.

Thanks for listening.

Kathy
 
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cjh1203 replied to 2010guardian's response:
Hi Kathy. Sorry, I misunderstood the situation. I'm glad that you don't have to think about hospice for a long time.

I do think that a lot of Alzheimer's patients go through a violent phase, which has to be awful. There are medications that can help. I think that most of them carry some risk for dementia patients, but it's one of those cases where the benefits often outweigh the risks.

My uncle went through a violent period, where he would even sometimes chase my aunt with a knife. The doctor prescribed something (don't remember what it was, but I think it was an anti-psychotic drug) that made a big difference. She was able to keep him at home. He died of a stroke, though, so if he'd lived longer, it might have been a different story.

Besides the company you've contacted, you could also get information about your options from the Alzheimer's Association, or your local Council on Aging (or whatever it's called where you live). You could get some unbiased information that way, to help you weigh the choices.

Trying to plan for the future as your husband's disease progresses is probably going to give you some peace of mind, even if it's something you'd rather not have to deal with. I'm not one for planning far ahead, either, so I admire you for getting a jump start.

I hope you'll let us know what you find out.

Carol
 
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2010guardian replied to cjh1203's response:
Thank you, Carol. It is good to have someone to talk to about these things. Otherwise, I just sit and think about them. I will continue to follow up. My husband has been doing very well the last 2 to 3 days, just about normal. The last two days he got up and cooked his breakfast. He functions like this for a while and then without warning, he can't function very well.
So, I'm thankful for the good times. and prayerful for the bad times.
God Bless you for your support.
Kathy
 
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cjh1203 replied to 2010guardian's response:
Hi, Kathy. Even though you know your husband isn't going to seem normal all the time, you must feel so grateful for the times he does. I imagine that seeing him cook breakfast gives you such a happy start to the day.

I hope that you'll both have more good days than bad for a long time.

Carol
 
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2010guardian replied to cjh1203's response:
Yes, Carol, it does make me happy to see him do the normal things he used to do. Another thing that makes me feel good is when we are having a conversation and he explains things to me. He wants to 'teach' me so I'll be able to handle things when he is gone. That shows much love to me.

Kathy


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