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    Increasingly Violent Anxiety Attacks
    avatar
    jaredlrice posted:
    I've had anxiety attacks ever since I was a child. My mother thought I was just being dramatic, but they were crippling when I was a kid. Now, as an adult in my thirties, I have been able to cope with them...most of the time. I notice the patterns of these attacks and try to pick them out while I'm having one so I can calm myself down. I chant over and over "you're not dying. Everything is okay."


    Recently they've become so violent and out-of-nowhere that I'm usually caught in the whirlwind before I even know that it's happening to me.


    What's particularly odd is that when I'm stressed to my maximum, I'm calm, focused and calculated. But, when I finally calm down and the stressful situation has passed, I get the anxiety attack.


    Although almost every doctor says not to use alcohol, I find that it's the only thing that calms me down. Once I'm buzzed, or drunk, all of it subsides and I feel fine...until I sober up.


    I realize that this is not the healthiest course of treatment, but without the ability to afford to see a psychiatrist, or to afford the ridiculously expensive anti-anxiety medicine, this is all I have. I was on St. John's Wort for a while and it was helping, but I started breaking out in rashes from using it too often.
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    whatsupbuttercup responded:
    My anxiety is the same. I'm calm and focused under pressure, and then my mind is released from what it's focused on and I panic. I think that the mind undergoes a lot of stress and then once it has nothing less to focus on, the stress just pours out of it in the form of an anxiety attack. Relaxing is hard! Even after I finished my school semester I had a mini-breakdown and had to get on a new med.

    Are there any community agencies where you live that offer counselling? It helps a lot. You have no drug insurance through the government?
     
    avatar
    jaredlrice replied to whatsupbuttercup's response:
    We don't have any community outreaches in my area for counseling. There's general triage and health assistance available in our county clinic but it's for impoverished people and it's only for body symptoms like broken bones, cuts and infections.

    I do not have drug insurance. Whatever I end up getting will be out of pocket and, as I understand it, anti-anxiety meds have to be taken on a regular basis and require constant refills which I would not be able to put money toward.
     
    avatar
    rohvannyn replied to jaredlrice's response:
    If you did see a doctor after all, and did get an anti anxiety prescription, make sure you ask them for a low cost generic. There are some meds that only cost a few dollars a month.
     
    avatar
    Reid Wilson, PhD responded:
    One of many cautions about drinking alcohol is that it places a lot of sugar into your system. Your body then secretes insulin to manage the sugar. By morning, you can experience a low blood sugar in response to the excess insulin. That may produce sensations that trigger your panic attacks.

    You can read up on self-help skills for panic HERE .


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