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Tonsils and Asthma
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CarolynBF posted:
Hello. I am 21 years old. I just got diagnosed with severe asthma( failed the test with the first dose) after about two years of troubles. I am having troubles with my tonsils and my nose. Come to find out, I have a deviated septum and tonsils that are enlarged. My tonsils pus, bleed and give me a horrible sensation in which I cannot swallow. My ENT was rather rude and said that if I am really bothered by this, I should get my tonsils out, or just forget about the problem. I do notice, when I get sick, my tonsils get so big and when I cough, I go into an asthma attack. I have been in the ER twice this year before of it. Should I fight to try and get my tonsils out, or is it not too good of an idea, or not help with my horrible and agonizing asthma symptoms? Thank you for reading, Carolyn PS I am also on Adviar, which I think I need a higher dose, and a nebulizer, which I LOVE. I was wondering if anyone has tried the portable one, I am a full time student and work a full time job, so I can only use my nebbie in the morning and at night and must rely on my handheld inhaler, but I hear about the smaller nebulizer and might ask my doc for it. Also, my peak flow numbers after 2 months of drugs is still only 150-250, should I inquiry about that? I dont want to annoy my doctor.
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starion06 responded:
I have huge tonsils but have never heard from my docs that they have a role in my asthma--would think about getting a 2nd opinion before scheduling surgery, but that's just me.

A cute nebulizer I saw recently at the American Association of Respiratory Care Conference in Anaheim is made by Respironics and it's very small and quiet. It can be used for all the nebulized meds, is portable and operates on battery power. The part the holds the medicine can be put in the upper rack of the dishwasher, which is another plus.

Since you like nebs so much, you may wish to consider nebulized steroids, Pulmicort Respules, which you may prefer over Advair. (It would replace the inhaled steroid of Flovent--you could use Performist to replace the long-acting beta agonist that is the Serevent portion of Advair as well).

What kind of physician are you seeing? Is s/he a specialist in asthma? A pulmonologist? General practitioner? Since you haven't noticed significant improvement after 2 months, you may wish to consider seeing a specialist or asking for a 2nd opinion if your current doc feels this is the best s/he can get you.

If your doc gets annoyed when you ask questions, you may wish to find a doc that will work with you to answer your questions.

Starion
 
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CarolynBF responded:
I am seeing a specialist. I have been reading articles that sometimes in children removing the tonsils has helped with coughing and asthma. I have severe asthma with very little wheezing, but a lot of coughing. I have had problems with my nose and constant ear infections......
 
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BeckySnell responded:
This doesn't help your problem, but I find it interesting that I have also been told that I have abnormally large tonsils for someone who is 24. I was once told by a doctor that your tonsils should shrink by around age 11 and mine never did. I wonder if its common for people with asthma to have larger tonsils?
 
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CarolynBF responded:
It's not that my tonsils are just big, but they touch at the back of throat. They also have large craters and bumps in which releases blood and pus when I cough or sometimes I even cough. I feel like I am choking and then can't breath. I just dont know what to do, my ENT says call my pulm. and the pulm. says call my ENT. It's so frustrating.....

Thanks, Carolyn


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