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    My boss doesn't understand
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    Martha425 posted:
    Hi all, I am new to this board, but I am willing to bet that someone out there has had or still has the problem that I've been dealing with. I was diagnosed with asthma very early in life, having no recollection of NOT having to take medication daily. Until about 3 years ago, my asthma was really well controlled with low dose flovent daily and albuterol for emergencies, and had been for over 10 years. I cannot figure out what happened or changed, but the past three years have been, well, challenging, to say the least. I've been through complete overhauls to my medications on a couple occasions, a handful of ER visits, a whole lot of prednisone, and a few days in-patient to get straightened back out, and many, many days where I was told by my doctor to stay home and take it easy. I was referred to a pulmonologist by my primary, and that doctor sent me to another pulmonologist at a larger research hospital because my case was "too complicated" (not what you want to hear!). While I have explained this to my employer and provided documentation from my doc, my boss does not seem to understand. She tells me if it is "JUST" my asthma, I shouldn't need to rest, but should be able to work. I am not able to work some days and I do call in, and I struggle through on even more days, pulling out the rescue meds frequently and hoping for a relaxed day. Does anyone have any suggestions (words, books, websites, brochures, whatever) that I could use to try to help her understand what I (we) are really dealing with, every day? I have been calm and nice (or I think so, the rounds of prednisone might say differently!) with her, but I am losing my patience and can't afford to lose or leave my job. My primary helped me with FMLA paperwork, but even this isn't enough. I really appreciate any suggestions people might have
    Reply
     
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    coughy16 responded:
    Have you already been approved for fmla? Have you tried talking with your hr dept?
     
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    Martha425 replied to coughy16's response:
    I think I was approved for FMLA, so far as I can tell. Work never gave me any paperwork back and when I asked about it, they said it was fine. ?? We don't really have an HR dept anymore--there's my boss and two others who are basically in charge. I let her know last week when I started round # 2 of prednisone, as I knew I wasn't doing well and she informed me of how many hours I have of paid sick and vacation time (less than 3 days). I don't know how to get her to understand that this is more than just having to take a couple puffs of an inhaler every now and then, which seems to be what she thinks. It's definitely frustrating.


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