Skip to content
Chest tightness: Allergic Asthma, Anxiety or something else?
avatar
girlincity posted:
I am 24 and have never been diagnosed with asthma, nor have I ever wondered if I should. But in the past few days, I've noticed a feeling of not being able to breathe as deeply as usual, like my chest is constricted. I have a stuffy nose and some other cold symptoms, but breathing difficulty that seems to be stemming from my lungs rather than my nose is not something I typically experience with a cold.

I have been packing for the past few days in preparation to move to a new apartment, and I am wondering if all the dust it's kicking up is what is causing this. Could I have allergic asthma if excessive dust exposure is the only thing that triggers it, and chest heaviness is the only symptom?

Also, I have been diagnosed with generalized anxiety, which presents itself in many physical symptoms when untreated (as it currently is). I know chest heaviness is a common thing to experience during stress (and moving is stressful), so perhaps it's just anxiety?

Thoughts? I'm trying to decide if it's worth mentioning this to my doctor, since in the past, GAD has typically been the reason behind all the weird stuff my body does...
Reply
 
avatar
amcate responded:
I was diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder as a teenager. The lungs were fine, then at 26 I had a persistent cough. The family practice doctor thought it was probably asthma or allergies due to my age and he said it was the most common disease that would produce a nonspecific cough in a young person.

I would mention it to the doctor to get a differential diagnosis done.


Helpful Tips

Xopenex savings
If you use xopenex you know it is expensive. My co-pay with insurance is $100. Today I found out about their Breath for Less Program. ... More
Was this Helpful?
21 of 35 found this helpful

Related News

There was an error with this newsfeed

Related Drug Reviews

  • Drug Name User Reviews

Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA

FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

For more information, visit the Duke Health Asthma and Allergies Center