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Astma in Toddler
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chimu_03 posted:
Hi My daughter has Asthma. Dr says she needs to start preventive treatment by taking small dose of small doses of Steroids. Does this treatment has any side effect?
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Aqua14 responded:
Hi there,

Was your daughter prescribed inhaled steroids? (e.g., brand names Flovent, Pulmicort) Or oral steroids? (generic prednisone, prenisolone, etc.)

If so, and if the dose is small, then the side effects will be minimal to nonexistent. My son's allergist said that Flovent, an inhaled steroid, is the best for kids as it stays in the lungs and doesn't have an effect outside the lungs.

Oral steroids have more side effects, especially if taken long-term, but sometimes a short 2 week course of oral steroids is necessary to quickly and strongly control an asthma attack. The risk from the oral steroid is less than the great benefit that you get from quickly controlling what could be a dangerous asthma attack.

You might want to search Amazon for a book that really helped me when my son was first diagnosed with asthma and allergies. It's called "What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Children's Allergies and Asthma." It's a little older (2003) so not current on the new medications out there, but the insights into how asthma affects kids are excellent and timeless.

Also the following website has excellent online materials which will give you a basic asthma education in an hour or less:
http://www.asthma.partners.org/NewFiles/GuideToAsthma.html

Hope this information helps. Take care & good luck. Judy


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