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Oxygen desaturation during sleep
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deanne65 posted:
I have been diagnosed with reactive airway disease and recurrent rhinnitis. I am also on thyroid medication, and have recently had a saliva cortisol test to see if my adrenals are not functioning well. I have been waking up very tired every morning, for as long as I can remember, and I am looking for possible causes.
I have taken it upon myself to measure my O2 saturation the first thing when waking up, and have found that I might be desaturating during my sleep. I have been well below 95 percent for the past couple of mornings, but am not sure if I am getting an accurate reading. My saturation goes up to 99 percent within several minutes of being awake, but it is during sleep that I am a little concerned about. Is minimal desaturation during sleep rather common among asthmatics? I know it can be for those with COPD, but I have not been diagnosed with irreversible COPD.
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sgbl88 responded:
Hi and welcome to the community.

You should discuss this with your doctor. This is a symptom of sleep apnea which can be serious and cause heart attacks. It can also be a symptom of asthma flare. I have desturated into the mid 80's when really sick and in a serious flare.

Definitely something to discuss with your doctor soon.

Take care and God bless.

Sonya
Jeremiah 29:11 For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, saith the LORD, thoughts of peace, and not of evil, to give you an expected end... Ye shall seek me, and find [me]


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