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    Tired All the Time
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    Mary_M1959 posted:
    Hi Everyone ~ I haven't posted in a while, but lurk around. I have a question. I've had asthma for 20 years now and have been on medications for it ever since, as we all know too well. My question is: Does asthma make you tired? I would think, yes, as we probably get less oxygen then our "non-asthma" friends.

    I ask this because I always need eight hours of sleep at night and so many of my friends and coworkers get six or seven. Even with that amount of sleep, when my asthma seems to be acting up more than usual, I'm an extra tired. I don't have any other health issues that would cause tiredness, already ruled all of that out...so just wondering how you all feel as far as tiredness.

    Thanks for your comments/knowledge on this.

    Mary
    Reply
     
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    Aqua14 responded:
    Mary, I think that's probably true, especially when asthma flares and your body has to do a lot of extra work to breathe and recover. I also get extremely tired when my allergies are acting up. So you may be on to something here.

    Take care & hope you are well. Judy
     
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    abbymay16 responded:
    The first sign my asthma is headed for a flare is that I find myself much more tired than is usual!

    And as Judy mentioned, allergies seem to cause the same reaction.

    For me, add to that the bouncing of hormones due to perimenopause and TIRED is a way of life lately. I need a good 9 hours of sleep most nights to be functional. So its not just you...it seems to be a trend for many of us.

    Mattie
     
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    sgbl88 responded:
    I agree with Judy and Mattie about the difficulty breathing taking more energy.

    I think of it this way too. My body is always fighting sickness and trying to stay well. It is in a constant state of trying to repair itself. When does that repair take place? While we are resting. That takes a lot of extra energy too. In addition to that, most of us also take antihistamines. Most which cause drousiness to some degree or another.

    Another thing to consider is that drs are telling everyone to get more sleep, seven to eight hours a night minimum. Those that go on six hours on a regular basis are wearing their bodies out. I have heard or read that some drs are recommending nine hours of sleep every night for everyone. I know I have always done better with nine hours of sleep. In college I would get sick in two weeks if I got less than that too many nights in a row..

    Get your zzzzzzz's.

    Sonya
     
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    PreparatoryProse replied to sgbl88's response:
    I am exhausted all the time. It doesn't matter if I had eight hours of sleep or a few, I am tired all day and can barely even hold my head up now. Here it is, 1/26/2013, and I still haven't taken my Christmas tree down. Never has this been the case with me before. Is this allergy/asthma related, combined with my age of 62? I surely hope not because I am so tired all the time anymore that all I feel like doing is sleeping and it wears me out even making out checks to pay my bills, or getting online to do anything. I hope there is a solution, and I hope we all feel better soon, or at least some time.
     
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    wdove53 responded:
    Hi Mary,
    I am just exhausted and very weak. To a point I can not work. The dilema is my Pulse/Ox is always between 98 and 100 which makes no sense but I am exhausted and SOB just taking a shower. Getting dressed. I have been this way for just 1 year and feel like it is forever. I have to nap during day. I think it is normal to be tired,/ exhasted because of working so hard to breath. My confusion is that I always show enough oxygen sat. crazy but tired I think is normal
    Ann
     
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    wdove53 replied to PreparatoryProse's response:
    I am 61 and feel just like you Preparatory Prose. I currently have no income and it is now becoming depressing and I feel at the bottom of the pit right now. I can not believe this is what life has come to. I too have allergy/asthma and add emphysema to that. I am so tired and weak all the time I really can't work. This is so encourageing to hear others feeling the same.
     
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    Janice65 replied to wdove53's response:
    Hi wdove53, I've had asthma for 11years now. I came down with the exact same symptoms as you...esp the SOB, basically couldn't function (sleeping, walking, even talking was a struggle) and like you, pulse/ox was perfect. I ended up in hosp for 5 days while they x-rayed to see if there was any lung infections or possible clots causing the SOB. No meds were improving it. My doc eventually decided to put me on anti-coagulants just in case there was a small clot he couldn't see on the scans. It worked like a charm! 2 months later, I am back on my feet. Still struggling with a low lung capacity but I am improving everyday on Budecort and very rarely need my quick reliever. And the tiredness is improving. I just make sure to sit and rest if my body demands it and exercise everyday for 30min. Hope my story helps.
     
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    amcate responded:
    Yes, I get tired very easily. My heart rate was 110-115 resting for a long time. The MDs thought it due to Advair, but then I was able to take Flovent instead for several months and yet the heart rate was high. Then they said it was due to elevation, so I lived a few months at sea level, but still it was high. So, they sent me to a cardiologist, who said the heart was normal and it must be compensating for the asthma and sent me back to asthma MD. By that time, I was back on Advair 500/50 and asthma MD said controllers were maxed out and it's not worth taking prednisone over. He then sent me back to PCP to rule out other medical conditions (like thyroid problems) which he did a blood test for severl common diseases, but all was normal. So, the final decision was the excessive tiredness and elevated heart rate was due to asthma and not a secondary effect of asthma meds.

    I got sick after I went into my profession, so didn't know this would happen. I've mentioned it before, but my job is physically demanding so I work on call for the flexibility. I was fortunate to get 30 hours of work a week for 3 months, so even though it made me exhausted, I did it since I can't rely on family or government for financial help. It's slowed down now, and I've been sleeping 15 to 16 hours a day to make up for it.

    Eventually, I settle into 9 to 10 hours a night.
     
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    amcate responded:
    I wanted to add a clarification: I said in another thread that the skin problems keep me from sleeping. They do make it hard, but eventually I fall asleep. Then, if I'm not working the next day I simply sleep until I wake up which over the last week has been 15-16 hours but normally is about 10. I also wanted to add that the cardiologist recommended strenuous exercise to bring the heart rate down, but I was already doing that. The asthma MD and PCP both said eating a diet high in antioxidants would help protect the heart (since the cardiologist said the heart was likely to have problems later from having to work so hard) and the PCP especially said to put all lifestyle factors possible to my favor (diet, exercise, enough sleep, clean air, etc.) as I'm at a high risk for diabetes due to asthma meds and family history. A book I read also said to try to decrease the overall stress on the body (not watching too much TV due to low level radiation among many other things) since it gives the body less things to spend its energy on.
     
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    bell68 replied to wdove53's response:
    Ann, I don't know if you will get this. Your last post was a couple years ago. I was curious how your doing? I have the exact same systems as you & my pulse PC is ways between 97-100. However just showering takes every ounce of energy I have. I haven't worked in over a week. So frustrated. I currently on Singular, symbicort, prednisone, xyzal & I just finished a z-pack. I'm hope you are doing well & might have some suggestions for me.

    Bell
     
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    bellw68 replied to bell68's response:
    Its Bell again, I had problems with my phone self correcting my text. My post is supposed to say:


    Ann, I don't know if you will get this. Your last post was a couple years ago. I was curious how your doing? I have the exact same symptoms as you & my pulse ox is ways between 97-100. However just showering takes every ounce of energy I have. I haven't worked in over a week. So frustrated. I currently on Singular, symbicort, prednisone, xyzal & I just finished a z-pack. I'm hope you are doing well.
     
    avatar
    veroctopus responded:
    Quite a number of asthma medications "steal" magesium from your body. Try a magnesium supplement or better yet try Epsom Salt in your bath!


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