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MRI of a Cirque du soleil performer - not your usual loading
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DanBlack posted:
Hi,
I'm an ex-Cirque du soleil artist. I suffered a back seizure during a show a couple of years ago.
I had an MRI and the specialist said it was fine and it was just muscle fatigue.


But I still get pains. The show i was on closed and I have no further treatment access available.
I'm going over my documentation trying to figure out what might really be wrong.


I get nervy shocks of pain even when doing normal activities but mostly after rehearsal or training sessions, despite my efforts at pilates and developing deep core stability.
My performances require lots of torsion and fast movement.... cross of martial arts with weapons and dance. I need to be able to keep moving, twisting and dancing to work.


Anyway, I would absolutely love a bit more clarity on my MRI results:



LUMBAR


Posterior bulging of the T12/L1, L1/2, 1.2/3, 1,3/4 and L4/5 discs minimally indenting the anterior surface of the thecal sac with no associated nerve impingement is seen. Mild dehydration of the L1/2 and L2/3 discs is noted.


Minimal marginal spurs are seen scattered in the upper lumbar vertebral bodies. No significant degenerative change is seen in the lumbar facet joints. Small chronic Schmorl's nodes are seen in the LI and L2 vertebral bodies. The alignment of the lumbar spine appears satisfactory with no spondylolisthesis or spondylolysis noted. No vertebral body collapse.



IMPRESSION:-
There are early spondylosis with minimal marginal spurs scattered in the upper lumbar vertebral bodies, minimal posterior bulging of the T12/L1 and the upper and mid lumbar discs, mild dehydration of the L1/2 and L2/3 discs and small LI and L2 chronic Schmorl's nodes detected.


There is no significant central canal, lateral recesses or neural foramina stenosis seen in the lumbar spine and no nerve impingement is suspected.




GIVEN CLINICAL DATA:- ? Discogenic pain.


THORACIC


REPORT:
Mild degeneration and narrowing of the T7/8 and T11/12 discs are noted. Slight posterior and anterior prolapse of the T11/12 disc slightly ir•iting the anterior surface of the thecal sac is seen but no associated nerve or spinal cord impingement is noted. Posterior bulging of the T7/8 and T10/11 discs minimally indenting the anterior surface of the thecal sac is also noted.


Early marginal spurs are seen scattered in the mid and lower thoracic vertebral bodies more prominent adjacent to the T11/12 disc. No significant degenerative change is seen in the thoracic facet joints. Chronic Schmorl's nodes are seen in the T8, T9, T10, T11 and T12 vertebral bodies. No vertebral body collapse or malignant marrow infiltrative disease is seen in the thoracic spine.


No significant central canal, lateral recesses or neural foramina stenosis is seen in the thoracic spine. The thoracic spinal cord and corms medullaris are normal with no mass, syrinx, abnormal signal or myelopathy seen. The thoracic nerves in their neural foramina are unremarkable and not being impinged. No abnormal paraspinal soft tissue mass.


IMPRESSION:-
There are spondylosis with early marginal spurs scattered in the mid and lower thoracic vertebral bodies, mild degeneration and narrowing of the T7/8 and T11/12 discs, slight anterior and posterior prolapse of the T11/12 discs, minimal posterior bulging of the 17/8 and T10/11 discs and chronic lower thoracic Schmorl's nodes detected.
There is no thoracic spinal cord or corms medullaris lesion or thoracic nerve impingement suspected.
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davedsel57 responded:
Hello and welcome.

I am not a doctor. Unfortunately, the health experts that are assigned to this WebMD Back Pain Community no longer reply to posts.

I have managed back pain for over 30 years due to many degenerative spinal conditions similar to yours. You need to take your MRI results and a copy of the films if you can get them to an orthopedic surgeon or neurosurgeon specializing in spine issues. You have much more going on than just muscle fatigue. The issues you have are due to structural abnormalities of your spine - discs problems, spurs, etc.

Once a spine specialist has given you a more accurate diagnosis, then you can seek a pain management specialist for treatment. The best type of pain management specialist is a physiatrist as they deal with various types of treatment.

In the meantime, you can do research on the internet. At the top of this WebMD Back Pain Community is a Tip about diagnosing and treating back pain. Within that thread is a post that give links to several sites on the web that provide good information about spine problems.

I pray you can find treatment and relief soon.
Click on my user name or avatar picture to read my story.

Blessings,

-Dave
 
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DanBlack replied to davedsel57's response:
Great, thanks for your help Dave.


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