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In Need of Moral Support
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indytechguy posted:
I'm posting, looking for some moral support. I guess I sufferer of chronic back pain. MRI showed a lot of bad areas along my spine (thoracic and lumbar). After having an injection in early September (it was not a part of the tainted supply), my back was actually worse for several weeks, then finally started to feel "better", then this past week, it is back to hurting, usually sitting aggravates it, and unfortunately, I'm a desk jockey for my job. I'm constantly taking my prescribed Tamadol or Hydrocodine to help.


How do some of you who suffer daily, keep your spirits up? How do you keep your mind from wandering to thinking you have something more serious? In my case, no matter how many scans and tests and doctors I see, when the pain is constant I can't but feel scared they missed something. Is it normal for a back injection to not "work"? Is it appropriate to discuss in detail my MRI results?


Anyway, thank you for reading my whining. I'm just frustrated and in pain.


IndyTechGuy
Indianapolis
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davedsel57 responded:
Hello and welcome.

I am sorry to read of your troubles. I fully understand.

It is vital to keep a positive attitude when dealing with chronic pain. Focus on anything or anybody in your life that is positive and a blessing. Be thankful for what you can do and try and accept that there are things you can not do. If you have any faith, make sure to keep that active and use that as a tool. If you find you are depressed, you may find a psychiatrist or psychologist that specializes in helping patients with chronic pain.

You are your best advocate for your health. Keep doing your research. There are many good sites on the internet that have information about spinal problems. Read through the Tip at the top of this WebMD Back Pain Community that lists the recommended steps for diagnosing and treating back pain. Within that tip is a post with links to good spine sites.

Keep moving as much as possible, Keep doing your research. Keep a positive attitude.
Click on my user name or avatar picture to read my story.

Blessings,

-Dave
 
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dianer01 responded:
Hi ITG,

I had a 3 level fusion about 5 years ago and while I am not in serious pain most days, I do have some limitations and am very choosy about how much and when I lift anything.

I too work a desk and sometimes sitting is harder than walking. For me, I have tried to divorce myself from toxic and negative relationships. I work hard, play hard and take my rest time very seriously too.

I try to believe in the power of what I can do, do the best I can and am no longer afraid of asking for help. Many people draw strength from their spiritual relationships. I would encourage you to look for the positive things in life and draw on them for support.

my best to you

di
 
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trs1960 responded:
I understand. I'm have spent 12 years and have 12 level fusions. Sometimes the pain is absolutley debilitating. I'm hoping I'm helping to raise my kids, but working around people that have energy and high spirits is a bit depressing. All I can say is we have to make up our own decisions to live on and know that we have a burdun most people don't. I guess in a way you can say that means we work harder just to be at that desk or whatever it is we do.

I'm pretty much a desk jockey too and people think that "At least all you have to do is sit." It's amazing how a bad back can make things like plugging in a computer, picking up a dropped quarter or just typing away at your keyboard feel like your living in hell.

It's sad when you comnpare the options. Working is hard, disability is a whole new adjustment of how to keep you mind occupied.

Just keep reasonable goals in mind and when you complete them feel good about it. Don't try to pretend you're a 21 year old stud that doesn't know what tru pain is. Listen to your body (I'm one to talk) and don't over do it.

My docs always tell me to slow down and keep expectations reasonable. I guess I'll tell you the same thing and wish you better luck at it than I have.

One thing that makes me feel proud is that I've worked 12 years in pain. My doc told me most people with near to an injury such as mine haven't made it past a year before giving up.

On the other side I'll warn you that sometimes we set personal goals that have no meaning to those we love and while we meet our goals we can hurt those we love most.

Best of luck.

Tim
 
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indytechguy replied to trs1960's response:
David and all, thank you for your words of wisdom. I think when it comes to my health and the issues I'm experiencing, I've always been a "glass half full" guy. David, I read your eight steps in "Steps For Getting Back Pain Diagnosed ", though I've done the steps prior to posting I appreciate you taking time to post them as it re-affirms that I'm on the right path and doing everything I possibly I can. My "faith" is strained to put it nicely, but knowing there are good souls here on the interwebs willing to reply to a stranger in need of comfort, only shows I need to step up and be counted.


@DianeR01 - I think I've pretty much narrowed it down to sitting is what causes my lingering pain. Thank you for the encouragement, I do need to find the positive things. With the constant pain, it will take some effort to keep the spirits up.


@TRS1960 - Well said on the goals. Though, with tongue in cheek, I will say I have been listening to my body that is why I'm here...it won't stop complaining.
It is not length of life, but depth of life. - Ralph Waldo Emerson


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