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Disk herniation and Aerobic exercise
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Nisha84 posted:
Hi, I have a question to the experts and members of this community.
I suffered a mild disk herniation at the level of L4-L5 in Sept 2007, which caused me to have bedrest for a couple of weeks , painkillers NSAIDS, and physiotherapy (for about 12 weeks), and it took me many weeks to completey get rid of the pain and get back to my usual activities.
Since then despite so many years (5yrs)I have been avoiding aerobic exercises like skipping, running or cycling as each time it causes stiffness and pain in my back at the same level, which increases with exercise and i stop ex in 1 week.
My question is , does this mean I can never exercise like run/skip to avoid the pain or should I exercise regularly and with time pain would resolve on its own?
I love running and skipping but I am afraid it will again cause herniation and cause backpain, please help me with any suggestions what should I do? what would be the best, safest way to continue exercising without fear of injuring myself again?(by exercise)
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davedsel57 responded:
Hello.

My experience is that the exercises you mention will continue to hurt and could cause further problems/damage to your spine. What you want to do is avoid any type of impact to your spine.

What most of us with serious spinal problems do is seek out some type of activity in a pool. There are many facilities that have water aerobic classes and that would be beneficial for you in many ways. Even just walking around and doing stretches in a pool would be good for you and should feel great.
Click on my user name or avatar picture to read my story.

Blessings,

-Dave


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