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New Thoracic and Lumbar MRIs
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Anon_176914 posted:
Dear Community,

Over the weekend I had new MRIs done. The results of the Thoracic are below - I'm a bit confused by the language they used on the report vs what has been reported before by the same facility at that.

Fortunately the lumbar MRI was pretty much the same as last year. There still is a very, very small amount of fluid collection at operative site - I have no idea how it can be there almost 2 years after the L4 L5 surgery. Otherwise, both L4-l5 and L5-S1 are still herniationed and mild stenosis.

I've had no improvement in symptoms. In addition to the 8 injections last summer (thankful none were tainted), I had 1 in November and recently had a lumbar medial nerve block with minimal changes. I've been on nerve meds and lots of anti-inflammatories.

It's itchy, very tender to touch, still having the lying down iliac crest pain, pain and weakness in leg (falling, tripping, etc.) and still no consistent directions from doctors. Doctors include neurosurg, neuro, physiatrist, and pain & rehab doc - at least 2 of each since last Spring. Late last Fall the only neurosurg that researches and has significant expertise in TSpine diseases, herniations and surgery had recommended a T3-T9 laminectomy and fusion.
Due to a "surprise" liver tumor, I ended up having that removed in December and the spine surgery was cancelled.

Although I've had imaging done at the same facility, the language used here is different...
In medical context does effacing mean pushing against?
Does ventral cord equal spinal cord?
From what I have read, the subarachnoid space is where the nerves are located. Is that correct
Thanks!

Findings:
There is normal alignment of the thoracic spine. Vertebral body heights and marrow signal are preserved. No abnormal cord signal is seen.
There is multilevel disc desiccation and loss of disc height from T4-5 through T8-9. No foraminal narrowing is noted at any level. Paraspinal soft tissues are unremarkable. No abnormal enhancement.

  • - At Tl-T2, there is a small central disc protrusion, minimally effacing the ventral subarachnoid space.
  • - At T2 T3, there is a small right paracentral disc protrusion partially effacing the ventral subarachnoid space.
  • - At T3-T4, there is a left paracentral disc protrusion, partially effacing the ventral subarachnoid space and indenting the left ventral cord.
  • - At T4-T5, there is a left paracentral disc retrusion partially effacing the ventral subarachnoid space.
  • - At T5-T6, there is a left paracentral disc protrusion partially effacing the ventral subarachnoid space and indenting the left ventral cord.
  • - At T6-T7, there is a large left paracentral disc extrusion, completely effacing the ventral subarachnoid space, and indenting the ventral cord.
  • - At T7-TB, there is a left central disc protrusion, effacing the ventral subarachnoid space and indenting the left ventral cord.
  • - At T8-T9, there is a disc protrusion completely effacing the ventral subarachnoid space and flattening the ventral cord.
  • - At T9-T10, there is a small left paracentral disc protrusion partially effacing the ventral subarachnoid space.
  • - At Tl0- 11, there is no significant disc bulge.
  • - At T11-T12, there is no significant disc bulge.

Impression;
Multilevel degenerative disc herniations, with the largest extrusion at T6-7, effacing the ventral subarachnoid space and indenting the cord. No abnormal cord signal or foraminal narrowing at any level.
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trs1960 responded:
Think more like minimizing. So I guess it may be pushing or at least decreasing the effectiveness.


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Try water therapy
I also have had surgery for L5S1,protruding disc for sciatic pain. Everything was fine for a year. Then the pain came back and the doctor ... More
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