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gabapentin
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miriam142 posted:
I was ran over close to two years ago and had extensive damage to both legs. It took quite a long time but last September I was diagnosed with nerve damage and was put onto Gabapentin for that. I slowly increased my amount until I was maxed out. It roughly works well enough in the day but they do burn a lot at night. It is possible they are causing severe nausea which I've had since the end of February. My legs are not improving. what do I need to do. I have been onto domperidone to improve digestion. I also have to where nighties at night because my legs burn too much and had to replace a lot of my pants because they irritated my legs.
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miriam142 responded:
In case people didn't know my dosage is 3600 mg a day. I also wonder sometimes if they will ever improve. The accident was 22 months ago.
 
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bj1208 replied to miriam142's response:
Hi and welcome to the support group

I have nerve damage in both my legs caused from damaged discs. I have burning sharp shooting stabbing aches pains in both legs. I also have numbness in both legs from the knees down. This is permanent nerve damage.

I also take gabapentin to help with the pains and I take the max 3600mg daily and it does help with the pains but does not do anything to the numbness as this is the permanent damage and nothing can help this NIR can it be reversed.

When taking the med i do take 1800mg in the morning and 1800mg at nite. I can tell if I miss a dose as my legs will start hurting. Now gabapentin does not take away 100% of the pains but it does help out tremendously.

Everyone is different and reacts differently to treatments. When you take the med how are you taking it? This med can be split up to taking it twice a day, three times a day or once a day depending on what works best for you. I was taking it 3 times a day but usually missed my mid day dose and started taking it twice a day.

One thing you may want to do us ask your doctor to test you for nerve damage with EMG and Nerve Conduction Test. This will show if you do have permanent nerve damage. Normally when nerve roots are irritated by an accident or surgery they can take up to a year or longer to heal themselves but if the damage is beyond that can be permanent.

Please let us know what you find out.
~~ Click on my name or picture and read my story ~~
~~ Joy ~~
 
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miriam142 replied to bj1208's response:
I went to see my family doctor today and she said the damage after all this time would not improve. It would be a waist of resources to get any more tests done. As for the pain clinic they are only working on 2010 cases right now so it would take at least two years to get in. I am going to go back on elavil for now to see if it might at least for a little while. I am curious though if there is anything I can do for the skin irritation.
 
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bj1208 replied to miriam142's response:
Hi -welcome back~~

What type of pain clinic are you trying to get into that is working on cases for 2010??

I think I would be searching for another type of pain clinic - especially a PHYSIATRIST Pain Clinic - this site lets you know what they are - they go deeper into pain management control than regular pain clinics.

http://www.spineuniverse.com/treatments/what-physiatrist

you can use the search engine at the top labeled: DOCTOR and put in for pain clinic and what it brings up you can see if there are any PHYSIATRIST Pain Speciaist.


Basically the Gabapentin helps with nerve pains in my legs (both) but there is nothing that will help with the numbness, tingling feeling like they are on fire etc.

this site helps explain what it's used for - mainly an anti-epileptic med that hits on the nerves in the body - it's been found to help the nerve pain in legs/arms etc.

http://www.drugs.com/gabapentin.html

I would continue taking this med as if you were to come off it you would feel more pains etc and also very important!! Gabapentin must be monitored by a physician in order to come off it as you must do it the same way you start it by slowly increasing it thus slowly decreasing it.

I don't think there is much you can do for the 'skin irritation' besides seeing your primary doc and/or pain clinic doc for that.

I hope you can find a pain specialist that can get you in sooner - please keep us posted~~
~~ Click on my name or picture and read my story ~~
~~ Joy ~~
 
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miriam142 replied to bj1208's response:
There is only one type of pain clinic where I live.
 
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bj1208 replied to miriam142's response:
Hi Miriam142 -

That is terrible - I must say you must live in a small town etc.

I think I would be searching for pain clinics even if they are a ways away - Better to drive distance than wait several years for the one where you live.

Is there hospitals around? some have pain clinics.

I'm sorry you have road blocks trying to find care -

Please keep us posted ~~
~~ Click on my name or picture and read my story ~~
~~ Joy ~~
 
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miriam142 replied to bj1208's response:
There are several hospitals around but our island doesn't have a high population and we are a fairly poor province. The one thing I am wondering is if I could go see a neurologist rather than just Spain specialist. There is also a chance that could go see a GP that works with a pain clinic. As for that type of doctor I would have drive about 5 hours to get there. I am also wondering what alternative treatments I could do. The islands population is around 147 500 and is about 10000 km but I live in the most populated area.
 
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bj1208 replied to miriam142's response:
Hi again

seeing a neurologist won't do you any good as they deal with neurology related to the head. They are nit associated with spine problems.

maybe you could speak with your primary doc and see if he/she can prescribe ur pain meds til you can see the pain clinic. Your primary may have some ideas for you too.

also your primary should be able to help you with referrals to physical therapist and/ir chiropractor.

hope this helps ~ keep us posted
~~ Click on my name or picture and read my story ~~
~~ Joy ~~
 
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trs1960 replied to bj1208's response:
That's not necessarily true . Here's the technical definition of a neurologist:
"A neurologist is a physician specializing in neurology and trained to investigate, or diagnose and treat neurological disorders.[ Neurologists may also be involved in clinical research , and clinical trials , as well as basic research and translational research . While neurology is a non-surgical specialty, its corresponding surgical specialty is neurosurgery . Neurology, being a branch of medicine, differs from neuroscience , which is the scientific study of the nervous system in all of its aspects. To be specific, neurology deals with the diagnosis and treatment of all categories of conditions and disease involving the central and peripheral nervous system; or, the equivalent meaning, the autonomic nervous systems and the somatic nervous systems , including their coverings, blood vessels, and all effector tissue, such as muscle."


We often go to a neurologist and/or a neurosurgeon for a second opinion to support or counter an Orthopedic.


My favorite author and one of the fathers of modern pain medicine was a neuroscientist. His partner was a PHD (psychiatrist) specializing in pain as the brain sees it.


There is no (as of yet) any black and white delineation of somatic/psychosomatic pain signal and brain interaction.


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