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How To Talk Sense Into Bi Polar Relative
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mwkitty4 posted:
I have a relative who's currently living with me, suffering from Bi Polar with angry outbursts. We only get quiet relief a few hours a day if this person takes their Seroquel. The symptoms of paranoia are getting worse by the day. Today I was woken up after a 12 hour work shift because this relative was searching the family PC history to see if he was "being conspired against & talked about."

He discovered I'd been on medical forum here searching for info. & threatened to sue me. The guy I'm seeing is an attorney ironically, & my bf said there's no way he can do that per 1st amendment, the fact that I'm searching for answers & help & the fact that anyone looking him up would likely find the police reports on his behavior long before they saw any question forums I'd visited.

Logic should say this to him too but an attorney will gladly lead him down a primrose path & take his money for an unfounded "libel or slander" suit, for which he'd end up owing my boyfriend a large sum of attorney's fees for defending me, as my bf is really sick to death of him, too.

Anyone who checks the computer history because they think people are "against them" needs real help & fast. In the mean time, this relative keeps finding reasons to come into where I'm working to interrupt & ask me if I'm "talking about him" when I'm not. My employer has exactly 27 recordings of his antics.
I'm worried I'm going to end up losing my job. He refuses to seek further help beyond the Seroquel, although it's recommended. I can't work in peace or sleep in peace due to the rants, outbursts, yelling fits, breaking things, etc. There are reports that document his behavior & the Victim Advocate at the police dept. called me today with those documents in hand to advise me she was forwarding this all to the State of Florida to have him committed,

That's good because he'll get the help he needs, but my mom is going to be very upset when he is committed. What can I do to convince him to se a doctor now before he has to be committed. If I don't call the victim advocate back with proof he's in therapy by Monday, he'll be committed by the state.
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ddnos responded:
mwkitty4 - Let him be committed because he needs the kind of help that you can't give him. Let the professionals do their job - this is beyond your expertise.

Debbie
Forgiveness is letting go of the hope that the past could have been any different --Unknown
 
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mattthecat responded:
I am with ddnos you should let them give him the help he needs. I have been there with my wife when she has been out of it before. On one end I hated to see her go to the hospital on the other end it was great see her get better.
So to sum it up take a break let him get help. your mother will change her mind when she sees her son is getting better.
i hope things get better for all of you soon.

Matt
 
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bipoet001 responded:
If your relative is in a manic episode, then his reality and your reality are not the same. You are talking about him. The difference is that you are seeking help, while in his mind you are exposing his condition to strangers. I'd suggest that it is difficult for professionals to communication with those in a manic episode, much less a relative. Living in your home needs to be conditional on your relative staying within all treatment considerations. Insure that he is not "medicating" with drugs or alcohol. If in anyway he is a threat to himself or anyone else, have him put on a hold for observation and perhaps getting his meds back on track. Males are more apt to take irrational actions and do things that are irreversable. I'd reconsider having him as your house guest at this time or in the future without storng conditions and an outside person who comes in to check on his meds and general health each day. David


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