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ACT Therapy & Self-Help Workbook
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mercygive posted:
I have struggled with anxiety and depression since I was a child. I have read, or begun to read, a lot of self-help books over the years but continue to struggle with anxiety and depression despite medication.


I bought a book The Mindfulness & Acceptance Workbook for Anxiety by John P. Forsyth and Georg H. Eifert based on an approach called acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). It's been years since I've worked in therapy and I am still convinced that anxiety remains the root cause or symptom of my BP. I chose this workbook over a cognitive therapy workbook because the word "Acceptance" in the title caught my eye and I thought instead of retraining my thoughts to focus on overcoming anxiety, it made better sense to learn to live with it if I can. My approach to this book is I will take the castor oil over the cherry flavored because it might have faster and longer lasting results as it sounds awful to learn to live well with anxiety.


So far, the first two chapters resemble the other books I've read and discarded because all I've accomplished is a long check marked list of anxiety symptoms which is depressing. Then there is that paragraph subtitle cliché 'A light at the end of the tunnel' which is where I usually lose interest because I hope for the 'at last' but I really don't believe I can have it -- been in the tunnel too long perhaps. Well, I bought the book because I acknowledge that I have a problem and for whatever reason I am willing to try to heal again.


Has anyone here tried ACT therapy for anxiety? If so, in what ways did it help or not help you?
A little yoga goes a long way
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