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Big Old Pharmacy Error (doubt there's a trigger in this one....)
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ssmiddy posted:
My psychiatrist wrote me a script for Haldol, 30, 5mg tabs.
I was supposed to split them, and take 2.5mg, twice per day.

Well, the pharmacy filled the prescription as 30, 1mg tabs, and the bottle instructions said to take half of a tablet twice per day....meaning .75mg, 2xday INSTEAD OF 2.5mg 2xday.

Do the math, and that is 1.5mg daily, vs 5mg daily, or right around 18% of the ORIGINALLY PRESCRIBED DOSE.

Now, I had an appointment with the CNP that works under this psychiatrist today, and i told him it was helping SOME, but that I felt that I needed more. He balked on me, and made every excuse in the book to not have me take more than .75mg/day (when in fact I was supposed to be taking 5mg/day), and told me that since I had only been on Latuda at 80mg for about a week, that I needed to wait and let that build up.

I was about to fire the guy, but instead, I called the pharmacy, who admitted error, and will have me a free bottle of 5mg Haldol tabs at some point tomorrow.

Now, I really don't give a crap about what my CMHNP has to say about it at this point, but I'll be taking the originally written dose, and he can shove his minuscule little doses of .75mg 3 x day straight up where the sun don't shine.

oh my God I am soooooo pissed off at the pharmacy, and also at my CNP for not listening to me when I told him something was mixed up.
I left his office irate, but politely.

People who deal with psychiatric meds really need to have their s*** together, ya know?

Check and double check your prescriptions between what the doctor says, and what is dispensed. Heck, voice record your meetings about meds for future use if necessary.

Whatever the case, pharmacies and doctors are NOT always right, and they need someone to watch them too. I imagine if I had not called the pharmacy, the error would have went on, and I'd be back to the ER again this week, with anxiety out the roof, yet again.

Just saying.....watch EVERYTHING to do with ALL of your MEDS. If YOU cannot, have someone else do it for you.

Ok, I'm done ranting. It's a very good thing I can't get hold of my MHCNP right now cuz I'd surely to goodness choke his a**! Tell me what I had was enough.....and me knowing it wasn't....SOB.
OUT
ssmiddy
~Sean
Reply
 
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ddnos responded:
Was this the first time the pharmacist has made a mistake? If so, I guess I would lean toward that not being a reason to be SO angry with him, yet still point it out to him/her. If he makes mistakes often, then of course, there'd be no excuse for that, and I'd take action above him.

I totally agree that anyone and everyone who ever gets prescribed any kind of medication should check to make sure they are what they say they are and the correct dose. I think that's a simple self-care practice that should always be implemented.

From your post and the anger you express, it sounds like this is something that has happened often and you are fed up, as opposed to this being a one-time mistake, yes?

Debbie
Forgiveness is letting go of the hope that the past could have been any different --Unknown
 
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ssmiddy replied to ddnos's response:
No, not fed up with the pharmacist.
Am ticked at the CNP who swore up and down that the pharmacy was correct, when the original prescription, it turned out, was quite different than the CNP was allowing for, even after I told him that 0.25mg, 2xday, although it was helping a little, could probably stand to be upped more than a little, and then he treated me like I was an idiot.

My anger stems from the psychiatrist practice's practices, not from the pharmacy's error.

By the time I left my CNP's office I was ready to just go off like a rocket on him for his lack of caring attitude, and his arrogance towards me, and NOW turns out HE was totally wrong, NOT me.

So, this morning I called and advised the office of the pharmacy error, and told them I'd be taking the originally prescribed (correct) dose. They were, at that point, all kind and understanding and all that crap.

Now today, I open my mail from yesterday, and there is a "no-show" charge letter from this office, and I have never missed an appointment with this dude. THEY have erred this time. I keep immaculate calendar records, and I looked at the date I allegedly missed, and there was no appointment or note about any such appointment.

I guess I'm either going to have to "work the kinks out" with these people, or just look elsewhere for care. I'll give it some more time and consideration, and make sure I'm making a good decision based on logic and not feelings.

We'll see how it goes I reckon. But, so far, they don't impress me much.
~Sean
~Sean
 
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ddnos replied to ssmiddy's response:
Hi Sean,

OK, understood.

My favorite thing you said in this post is, "I'll give it some more time and consideration, and make sure I'm making a good decision based on logic and not feelings." YES! I think you might be the first person here that I've actually "heard" say that truth re making a good decision based on logic, not feelings! So many people consistently do the opposite, and it ends up not always being the most wise decision. I try to apply that principle in my life as much and often as I can because feelings are fickle and always changing and can turn the tide of our behavior in the wrong direction - AND, when we let our feelings always dictate our behavior, we are being controlled by them, as opposed to letting our minds do that through logic and facts!

So your pdoc is new to you or fairly new and you're trying to decide if you can work with him or go somewhere else? Fun - NOT!

Good luck!
Debbie
Forgiveness is letting go of the hope that the past could have been any different --Unknown


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