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Lexapro/Lamictal/Clonazepam
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cougar1470 posted:
Have any of you been on this mix of medications? Wow !!!!!! What a trip this is, But I feel better

I went to Pdoc and told him I was still hearing some things and couldnt sleep. Also told him im HYPER now most of the time so he added CLONAZEPAM 1MG TABLETS at bed time SO thats 20 mg LEXAPRO,200mg LAMICTAL,1mg CLONAZEPAM. 2 of there drugs are for seizures.???????????? Never had one tho, unless Bipolar is a seizures disorder of such? I see im talking off the wall agan so I will shut up AGAN and let somone help with my question. FYI im on cloud 9 ,,,,,, Happy as hell. Is that good or bad?
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hope7951 responded:
Hmmmmmmm...if you are feeling very happy it is probably your Lexapro throwing you manic. You are on an anti-depressant, a mood stabilizer and a anti-anxiety med. These are all pretty common for bipolar.

Lamitical is one of thre types of mood stabilizers and was developed for epilepsy and leter found to be effective for bipolar mania. it is generally taking up to therapuetic levels in steps that take 6 weeks or so to get you to the right level for stablization. The anti-depressant takes 2-3 weeks to kick in. If you are bipolar and have a full level of an anti-depressant while your mood stabilizer is still low, you could be going manic. The other med is used to help with sleep and relaxation from stress but uonly masks the symptoms and doesnotchanges things. It is also highly addictive.

Happy as hell might warrent a call to your pdoc to make sure you do not go over the line while meds are not at levels. Make sure you are sleeping and resist the urge to buy things, drive fast, tell you boss what you think of him or start having sex with strangers. Mania will cause you to do all these things. Welcome, Joye
 
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cougar1470 responded:
guess your post came to late. I got into a fight with the wife last nite ( she started it ) it got heated and youldnt get out of the car ( we had just pulled into her familes drive way ) I just wanted to be alone to cool off but she just kept on going. bla bla bla , so i got out , tosed the keys and walked away.

she and her mom found me about an hour and a half later wandering around about 5 miles away.

all I want is to be happy agan I just cant
 
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adb227 responded:
I have had manic issues with the Lexapro, where I feel other SSRIs have not been the case. I was so amped up I started taking Clonazepam during the day with the Lexapro and I felt whacked ... pupils dilated, too happy and unable to focus.
I would not take these two together!
I have anxiety issues and mild depression.
Be careful of this combination!
If you do okay on the Lexapro but still experience some anxiety, try another medication with it or natural help.
Lexapro, Paxil and sometimes Zoloft are very "activating" SSRI's ...
since I started taking the Lexapro I can work hard and get a lot done except when it comes to time mgmt, reading, focusing, prioritizing ... Like I have extreme ADD.
I am going to switch back to just the Ativan, since it helps a little with mild depression, works instantly on anxiety, and doesn't make me feel whacked out in very small dose. Thanks for listening and pay attention to any bizarre side effects, especially if they continue after a few weeks.


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