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Bipolar II Questions-Possible Trigger?
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midge6869 posted:
Hello, I've posted here before but its been a while. I was diagnosed Biplar type II. I was taking Lamictal 200 mg and Lexapro 10 mg. I told my pdoc that Iwas getting more depressed lately so he just increased my Lamictal to 250 mg. I've only had one manic episode in my life (believe it or not, it was when I was taking Welbutrin). I have been on many antidepressants that always seemed to work, but then would stop being effective. Last one I was on before I started taking Lamictal was Effexor. The Effexor actually made the depression worse. Mostly I have depression. Once in a blue moon I will be hypomanic. I was wondering, sometimes I start my day in a pretty good mood, but in the evening get extremely depressed. Does anyone else have this happen? It seems to be more happening more frequently lately. Thanks for any advice.
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hope7951 responded:
You may want to get a second opinion. If you hypomanic episode seemed to come from taking an anti-depressant, then you may have unipolar depression while being treated for bipolar depression. If your meds aren't working, perhaps you should start over and add therapy to work on issues that may be depressing you.


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