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Do you exercise? Why or why not?
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Haylen_WebMD_Staff posted:
With different medication side effects, pain and energy levels, I thought it would be interesting to learn about the exercise routines of the members of this community.

Do you exercise? How and how often? If not, what are the barriers you face?

Haylen

p.s. Some WebMD study reports:

Vigorous Exercise and Breast Cancer Risk

Nutrition and Exercise During Breast Cancer Treatment

Vigorous Exercise Reduces Risk of Breast Cancer in African-American Women
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JLAMB26 responded:
I'm so glad you are starting this conversation! I finished chemo 10 weeks ago and was also wondering about exercise and if and when I could handle it. I started new program at the Y called the "Live Strong" program. It is specifically designed for recent chemo/cancer patients. It is a combination of cardio, weight training and yoga and meets twice a week for an hour and 15 minute class. We all go at our own pace. I'm still going slowly. My local Y has created a wonderful atmosphere to help me get my energy and strength back. I started two weeks ago after getting my doctor's approval. My barriers are joint and muscle aches that make it hard to do some of the exercises. I had all my lymph nodes removed along with a mastectomy on my left side. I'm still stiff and sore. I also still have my port since I'm getting herceptin treatments for 5 more months. My doctor warned my not to weight train where the port can be affected. I have a 9 month old baby girl and 4 year old son (and work full-time) so time is my biggest barrier. I have high hopes that exercise will help my side affects left from chemo. I'd love to hear from others.
 
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cindy12345678 responded:
HI! I think exercise is so important. I finished chemo in Jan'11 .I still get herceptin every three weeks for awhile. I have ridden my stationary bicycle the whole time. It really helped with fatigue. Even if I felt crummy and only did a few minutes, it seemed to help. Now I also do physical therapy for may arms because of Bi-mastectomy. And now I am also starting a routine for my abs.
 
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kiwiallright responded:
HI,

I have walked at least three miles a day since 1987 - I figure that I am close to about 24,000 miles averaging about 900 miles a year, I have had BC twice and walked through all the treatments and during my second round I rode my bike - I began road biking about 2006 - before May 2009 I was averaging about 50 miles a week, when I went through good ole chemo I kept up riding as much as I could but the energy was not there, mind you after my last chemo treatment I went riding with a friend who I had ridden many times with and had to wait for him to catch up to me, Last year my average weekly ride was about 22 miles - this year I hope to increase to 50 miles a week if I can -

It is up to very one individually what one can do - I know the continued excerise helped me through chemo, surgery and radiation and helps with depression. Does it stop cancer and other diseases probably not - but it helps me get through each day. Nothing beats seeing the sunrise - wouldn't miss it for the world - -
 
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brcansur responded:
I used to walk and hike a lot but since chemo my energy is so low and my arthritis and fibro has also gotten worse so it is hard for me to do as much. I go to water therapy at least twice a week if not more. I do go on hikes but am in pain for 3 -4 days after and very tired. I used to hike a least 2 -3 times a week before chemo walk a least 4 times a week and gym 5 days a week. My bones hust I am getting leg and toe cramps all the time and tired all the time so very hard to exercise when always tired and sore before you even do anything. would love to be able to do more activity outdoors. Roberta


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