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    Microcalcifications and Early Signs of Breast Cancer
    avatar
    MCEzzia posted:
    A microcalcification is an increase of calcium in one spot. They are widespread and most women will have a few on their mammogram at some point in time. The majority of them are benign. A good number of women do worry regarding them, though - maybe since they haven't been given a complete clarification of what they are.
    Microcalcifications couldn't be experienced on clinical exam or your own breast self-exam. They do not harm. This is the value of mammography - it finds them long prior to they could move forward into an actual lump.
    Most of the time, suspicious microcalcifications will be biopsied by means of a stereotactic method that enables the doctor to pin down their location and take away a sample consequently it could be examined by a pathologist. The intention of removing tissue by means of this method is not to get rid of all of the microcalcifications but to obtain a representative sampling accordingly a diagnosis could be completed.
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    Rachael67 responded:
    I am a little puzzled by this post. (When I went to the site you gave, I could find no mention of microcacifications...Perhaps I didn't read closely enough?)

    The statement "They do not harm" seems odd. And the later in the post you say "The intention of removing tissue by means of this method is not to get rid of all of the microcalcifications but to obtain a representative sampling accordingly a diagnosis could be completed." I don't think you mean that they are nothing to be concerned about, do you? Or that they shouldn't be removed except for the sampling in the biopsy? DCIS is soemthing which must be addressed and dealt with. A biopsy alone is not the answer. Please correct me if I have not understood your post.

    Blessings.
    Rachael
    Just when the caterpillar thought her world was over, she became a butterfly! Don't give up five minutes before the miracle!!
     
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    clairebent replied to Rachael67's response:
    Because this website is MFA (Made For Adsense) Because of it, you can not trust this source. If you see trouble or very basic design (and no logo) and poor articles plus Adsense, it means MFA sites.


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