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Breastfeeding after C-sect.
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Clover719 posted:
Hi everyone.....I hope no one minds that I'm lurking from the 2nd trimester board but I thought some of you might have some good advice for me....

I'm 21 weeks pregnant and for medical reasons there may be a slight chance I'll have to have a c-section rather than the vaginal birth that I'm really hoping for...I've read before and heard from friends that it can be harder to get the baby to "take to" breast feeding when you've had a c-section because there isn't that immediate bond? But, I also know people who have been successful doing it after a c-section.

Does anyone know any facts about this? Or had a c-section and still been successful?

Sorry if this was kind of long...and I really appreciate any feedback you can give me!!
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jatsharp32 responded:
I had a c-section and was able to breastfeed my baby less than an hour after the procedure. So as far as there not being an "immediate bond", I didn't have that. They say to get the baby to your breast as fast as you can after the c-section and I would say most hospitals are accommodating to this...I had my daughter in a VERY rural hospital and there was no issue with having her immediately breastfeed. We did have an issue however with inverted nipples and a tongue tie so probably less than a week after she was born, I started to pump and pumped every bottle for 2 months...I never had any issues with supply or anything and was able to pump 32 ounces a day with just 4 pumping sessions. So I would say I was successful and probably if I had more contact with a lactation consultant I could have probably put her back to the breast but the pumping wasn't too bad...it just seemed like double or triple the work!! So I would say from my experience that you can totally breastfeed after a c-section and be successful!!
 
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skerina responded:
You can definitely be very successful breastfeeding after a c-section.

I had an emergency c-section, under a general anesthesia, and we're still going strong. It was somewhat difficult to get started, but I attribute that to the medications, not any bonding issues. For one thing, a general anesthesia (which you probably wouldn't have with a scheduled c-section) tends to shut down body functions, so it took a bit to get things flowing at the start. The other problem is that it's hard to focus and do a great job at a brand new task (and it's brand new, no matter how much you read about it in advance) when you're drugged up. Not that I would advise going without drugs after major surgery! Just try to be patient with yourself as well as with baby...it's all new to her too!

HTH! Any other questions, feel free to ask!

-Amber
 
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kibs21 responded:
I don't think it's harder for a baby born by c-section to take to breastfeeding vs a vaginal birth. There is the immediate bond you will have with your child no matter how they come into this world. We had planned on a vaginal birth and ended having an emergency c-section. I remember telling the nurses as we prepared for the c-section that as soon as possible I wanted to start breastfeeding my daughter. As long as you communicated you concerns to your doctor/nurses you shouldn't have anything to be concerned about. Just remember nobody can read your mind. I have been very successful breastfeeding my daughter, I plan to until she's 1.

It took 6 days for my milk to come on but i never once was concerned. I had positive support from my husband and family. My doctor was also great to keep encouraging me. Allthough we left the hospital pretty shakey with the whole breastfeeding thing you have to keep at it. Let the baby latch on, and nurse even if you don't feel like you've got any milk yet. You have to let the baby keep stimulating your breast in order to give them the GO signal.
 
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shiftworkerinicu responded:
I had an unplanned C-section and didn't get to hold my girl for at least an hour after she was born. She latched on immediately and I've never had issues with her latching on (we had other BF'ing issues). HOWEVER, I can't say I really bonded with her for at least a week after she was born. It's totally normal, even for mom's who have vaginal births. Sometimes it just takes time.

OH, and my milk came in 2.5 days after the section (had her Sat. morning and milk was in Mon night). I just nursed her on demand (about every 2-3 hours for her) and she did great.
 
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EH0201 responded:
I had a VB and didn't get to hold DS until 10 minutes after he was born due to him breathing in fluid. I held him for less then a minute and he went straight to the NICU for 5 hours then to the nursery for an hour or so. He was not given anything to eat during that time, and when they finally brought him to me he latched on great the 2nd try and pretty much has not left my boob ever since.

Just make sure you tell the nurses you are planning on breastfeeding and they won't give him anything but a paci unless you don't even want that
 
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harley28146 responded:
I had a C-section also. I would say the hardest part with breastfeeding after a c-section is having the baby rest on your stomach. I would definately invest in a boppy and bring it with you to the hospital. That was the most uncomfortable part. It took 2-3 days for my milk to come in. I woke up one morning and it felt like I had two bricks sitting on my chest. I didn't know that it would hurt that bad. I did however start to pump while I was in the hospital just because of her sitting on my stomach hurt REALLY bad. I have been pumping ever since. I never went back to the actuall breastfeeding.
 
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fsuchick1976 responded:
I had an emergency c-section and didn't have any problems other than a small latching issue which we quickly solved with the help of a lactation consultant. They brought my LO into my recovery room about an hour after the surgery.

I agree that having the baby rest on your stomach can be hard. For the first week or so, we used the football hold.
 
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JoeBabes responded:
Your friends are completely wrong. I had a c-section. My son is 13 months and I am still breastfeeding. I have been from day 1. One has nothing do with the other.
 
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Nicolean responded:
I had an unplanned csection and a nicu baby and was able to BF and am still doing so 4.5 mos later. We are doing great!!
 
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kerubottom responded:
Lurking from 1 yr old board. I had an unplanned C section and due to complications didn't get to hold my DD until about 3 hours after she was born and we had absolutely no issues with bonding or BFing. She took right too it.
 
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Jamelita responded:
Not only did I have a c-section but I also had a 32 week preemie who could not even suck...she spent a month in the NICU and was STILL able to BF when she came home. I BFed her for over a year and the only reason I weaned her is because I'm pregnant again. Where there's a will, there's a way
 
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Pecan1978 responded:
I ended up VERy overdue and in emergency c/s after my water broke and had meconium in it .... DS also had like 5 times the normal amount of fluid, so I dunno if that influenced anything.. anyway, because I was overdue I had tried using my breast pump to stimulate contractions and ended up getting a few ounces of colostrum (I had been leaking since week 14, so nothing new for me at that point). I made sure I froze that and took it to the hospital with me. They fed it to DS while I was recovering from my c/s and Hubby staid by DS's side the whole time!

DS and DH came back to me in recovery and we got to BF right away. I'll agree with PP - I am SOOO glad I had a boppy with me there! I read alot beforehand and I still made sure to have a lactation consultant come by. You never know what issues may arise. My DS's meconium had made him congested and we had that to battle with while BFing... We still did very well, he just ,em, spilled alot because he kept losing his latch to gasp for air. Thankfully, my overabundant supply could handle his "drinking problem" hehe

Also, stay ahead of the pain with your meds... it takes everything wayy off track with the pain if you don't. And invest in some of those almost diaper like super duper overnight maxi pads... I sure needed them for the lochia flow... I also needed iron pills because my lochia was such a high volume.. just something to prepare for. Oh, and if you see a little bit of clear fishing line looking stuff poke out, it is just a dissolvable stitch coming out before it dissolved.... very normal as I found out, to just trim it and move along..... (that one freaked me out and my DR nearly laughed at me! hehe He had more tact than that, but I could tell he was amused!)

Boy, that seems like alot! But all stuff I WISH someone had told me before preparing for the possibility of a c/s.... we had the intention of a VB and it didn't happen that way for us!

GL
 
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luvmy2babiesmuch responded:
i've never heard of that. i had 2 c secs, and both babies nursed just fine.. i think it's a mind thing,, if you go into it with doubt, you will surely fail.. it just happens that way,, mind over matter, when it comes to BF.. one ob, put baby directly on my neck, immediately after birth, the other baby i nursed within an hour, and i could tell NO difference.. also, it is VERY important that the nursery let the baby room in w/ you, and NOT to give them water, paci, etc.. YOU CAN DENY all and everything at the hosp.. i used that with each baby, and while they were glad when my stay was over, i had the BEST experiences, and my baby wasn't ruined due to paci, sugar water, every 2 hr visits, etc.. or even needless vaccines.. you should look into pros and cons, anything other than moms milk destroyees natural antibotics and enzymes in babies stomache... i wouldn't even let them bathe my baby! check into it!!! sorry to hijack this post! good luck
 
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tlb209 responded:
I had an uplanned C-section and BF my LO after she was born......well, she got a bottle her very first feeding because I was kind of out of it. After that we were good to go and she is still BF'ing at 8 months. Good luck!


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