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    Lung Cancer and continuing to smoke
    avatar
    An_250987 posted:
    I've seen comments concerning people who smoke after being diagnosed with cancer. I don't believe any of the people making the comments are smokers. I smoked for more than 30 years when I was able to quit. I was addicted to cigarettes. Most likely the nicotine. I had been a non smoker for more than 5 years when something happened in my life that was very stressful. I went out and bought a pack of cigarettes. Immediately I was back to smoking 3 packs a day. Quitting the second time was very difficult. Just telling someone to quit won't do a thing. In comparison, I drink alcoholic beverages, but I'm not an alcoholic. But if I smoke one cigarette, I'll be right back to smoking. Anyone who is or has been addicted to cigarettes will tell you they smoke because they need to and most of them will say they actually enjoy smoking.


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