Skip to content

    Announcements

    Exciting News for WebMD Members!

    We've been busy behind the scenes building new message boards for you. You'll have new and easier ways to find messages, connect with others, and share your stories.

    And, this will all be available on your smartphone or other mobile device!

    What Do You Need to Do?

    The message board you're used to will be closing in the coming weeks. While many of your boards will be making the move to our new home, your posts will not. Want to keep a discussion going? Save posts you want to continue (this includes your member profile story), so that you can re-post them in the new message boards.

    Keep an eye here and on your email inbox, we'll be back in touch soon to give you all the information you need!


    Yours in health,
    WebMD Message Boards Management

    Related Communities - Stroke Community | Alzheimer's Community
    Still Alice
    avatar
    Louise_WebMD_Staff posted:
    A few weeks ago I picked up Still Alice by Lisa Genova from the large print section of the library for my mother. She read it and said it was good and I should read it. I stalled. It is about a woman, 50, who is diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's. With the memory loss on Mama's part...I didn't really want to think about it. I still don't. But, the book is excellent and really thought-provoking. There are parts that are very hard and some parts beautiful.

    Has anyone else read it? Is there another book that really touches your life as a caregiver that you recommend?
    Reply
     
    avatar
    cloud_berry responded:
    I've never read Still Alice (but now would like too), one that touched my heart was Memory Lessons by Jerald Winakur, he is a doctor that works with older patients and he also talks about his aging father in the book and his struggles, we think doctors know everything and are above it all but he casts a human shadow on that and I enjoy his perspective on it... one of those books that require kleenex but worth reading.

    Elder Rage-Or Take My Father Please!: How to Survive Caring for Aging Parents - Jacqueline Marcell - alot of humor (used to describe a very difficult situation) and excellent advice. My father got a huge hug after my reading this because he can be obstinate and difficult, like most people that are cared for he definitely has his moments but he's never been quite that bad. Reading this book put things in perspective and she writes in that if we don't laugh kind of way...

    Nasty, Brutish and Long:Adventures in Old Age and the World of Eldercare: Offers insight from someone who has aging parents and works in psychologist in nursing homes, I like this book because it brings insight on how Older people are feeling... I'm always trying to understand how it is for them... it makes it easier with Dad thinking about what his perspective on things might be, see both views with this book... I also like reading My Stroke of Insight:A Brain Scientists Personal Journey-Jill Bolte Taylor, it gives hope and further perspective.

    But mostly on a bad day I like to read something like All I really need to know, I learned in kindergarten (Fulghum) because even if I'm crying I'll find at least one story in it that will reliably make me laugh and sometimes that break is really what we need.
     
    avatar
    Louise_WebMD_Staff responded:
    Wow great list. I will have to put these on my library list. Thank you


    Spotlight: Member Stories

    In 2006 my husband fell in the hallway hitting his head blowing his c-3 disc in his neck bruising his spinal cord becoming a quadriplegic.Since it wou...More

    Helpful Tips

    Revised: New Features on Exchanges!
    Dear Members, You may have noticed some changes that happened to your Exchange after last weekeend. We rolled out a few new features and ... More
    Was this Helpful?
    14 of 23 found this helpful

    Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA

    FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.