Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up
Transfat and heart disease; Observation
avatar
bobby75703 posted:
I avoid transfats like the plague. They cannot possibly be good for you.

Observation: Death rates from heart disease in the USA began its decline long before transfats became publicly known.

Ironically usage of transfats was on the increase when death rates from heart attacks began its downward trend after 1968.

It wasn't until 1990's and 2,000's that public awareness of transfats became widespread, and associations were drawn between transfats and cardiovascular disease.

I'm not defending transfats, nor am I denying any connection with transfats and heart disease.

But I am observing heart disease began its decline 20 years prior to public awareness of trans fats, and eliminating them from the food supply beginning in 1993.
Reply
 
avatar
bobby75703 responded:
Notice in this graph, US consumption of margarine (which is mostly pure trans fat) didn't begin to fall until 1993.

But death rates from heart disease began its decline 25 years prior to the decline in margarine consumption.

US consumption of butter remained relatively level from 1969 to 2004 while heart disease declined from 1969 to 2004.

Consumption of trans fat filled Margarine was at its highest during the decline in heart disease.

 
avatar
bobby75703 replied to bobby75703's response:
Margarine is only one source of transfats.

According to the following graph, NEW products didn't start dropping trans fats until 2003.

But heart disease had begun its decline 35 years earlier.

 
avatar
bobby75703 replied to bobby75703's response:
Is this graph we can see US heart disease mortality declining from 1970 to 2005 and compare it with the graphs above.

Notice the decline in heart disease deaths during the 20 year span from 1970 to 1990, while consumption of trans fatty margarine was at its highest.


 
avatar
bobby75703 replied to bobby75703's response:
During the 1970's and 1980's while McDonalds was cooking in natural beef tallow. Death rates from heart disease declined in the USA.

In 1990 McDonalds switched to hydrogenated soybean/corn oils (Trans fats) and heart disease continues its decline for the next 25 years.

It wasn't until 2008 McDonalds dropped the trans fats from its cooking oils, 39 years after heart disease began its decline.
 
avatar
toneman84084 replied to bobby75703's response:
In 1990 McDonalds switched to hydrogenated soybean/corn oils (Trans fats) and heart disease continues its decline for the next 25 years.

Right about the time statins were introduced in 1987, makes sense. Shows how effective statins are.

Also, don't forget that there was a large decrease in the number of smokers during this time as well, especially after the 70's.
 
avatar
bobby75703 replied to toneman84084's response:
Right, there was a substantial decrease in smokers in the 1970's.

However the decline rate in heart disease deaths remained unchanged with McDonald,s changes in cooking oil.

Also the decline rate in heart disease deaths remained unchanged pre and post statins. The decline was already in progress 20 years prior, and the introduction of statins didn't put a dent in the graph line.
 
avatar
farsidexyz replied to toneman84084's response:
It's the decline in smoking and not statins. However, there is a direction relationship between statins use and heart failure.

 
avatar
bobby75703 replied to farsidexyz's response:
I agree. The decline in smoking. And the decline in raw emissions from cars and industry coincide with the decline in death rates heart disease.

Changes in cooking oil at McDonalds had zero impact on death rates from coronary heart disease.

The introduction of statins had zero impact on the death rates from coronary heart disease.


The rise in heart failure does follow the increase in use of statins.
 
avatar
toneman84084 replied to bobby75703's response:
The introduction of statins had zero impact on the death rates from coronary heart disease.

Bobby, you can't keep going in two directions. You started another thread recently where you said no one could predict how much plaque would build up in any one person's arteries yet you feel you can definitively say that there has been no impact from statin use. How do you know how each individual has been impacted? You just don't know. The same principle applies one way or the other, you can't just use it to fit one argument and against it in the next. Saying that statins have had zero impact on heart disease is like me saying I can predict how cholesterol will cause plaques in everyone.
 
avatar
toneman84084 replied to farsidexyz's response:
How is this equated to statin use? What is being used to make this statement? The chart really doesn't explain much. Also, please remember that there is an increase of heart disease as we age and the general public is becoming more aged than previous generations. How is that taken into account when looking at a chart like this?
 
avatar
bobby75703 replied to bobby75703's response:
The photos below are just two items I believe had a major impact on the decline in heart disease in the USA. The more I study, the less I believe McDonalds had anything to do with heart disease.

Want to see two things that saved lives? Look below:




This is an EGR valve. It contributed to people breathing less toxic exhaust from cars.




This is a catalytic converter. It helps reduce harmful emissions from ending up our your arteries.

Stopping smoking also eliminates harmful emissions from entering our arteries.

When America decided to stop smoking, restricted emissions on cars, and the 1970 act to curb air pollution from industry took effect, death rates from heart disease began its decline.

When fast food consumption in America skyrocketed, death rates from heart disease continued its steady decline oblivious of fast food's existence.

Next statins were introduced with ZERO inpact on decline rates in heart disease.

McDonalds changes cooking oils from beef tallow, to trans fats, then trans fat free, with zero impact on death rates from heart disease.

Its time to think outside the box and realize we INHALE into our arteries substantially more than we could ever eat. The 1950's and 1960's were without question the 2 worst decades for heart disease. They were also the two smog laden decades for America.

I don't agree with trans fats. I avoid them to the extent possible. But I no longer view trans fats as being a direct cause of heart disease.
 
avatar
billh99 replied to bobby75703's response:
I just thank my lucky stars that you are not an epidemiologist. And even when using scientific analysis and find something appears to be a cause or cure, when tested in clinical trails they where found not be the agent that made the change.

 
avatar
toneman84084 replied to billh99's response:
Amen...............
 
avatar
bobby75703 replied to toneman84084's response:
You have both been bought by the drug companies. Literally, they spent a ton of money to buy you guys. You belong to them now.


Featuring Experts

There are no Expert stories for this community right now

Helpful Tips

Cholesterol
If i am trying to lower my cholesterol should i be looking at the fat or cholesterol in food? More
Was this Helpful?
4 of 6 found this helpful

Helpful Resources

Be the first to post a Resource!

Related News

There was an error with this newsfeed

Related Drug Reviews

  • Drug Name User Reviews

Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA

FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.