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Is My HDL Too Low?
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Arn5822 posted:
I'm a 64 year old male and about 6 months ago I was started on blood pressure medication (blood pressures ran about 150 / 90) and total cholesterol was high (running around 265). In six months I've lost 20 pounds (so far) and am working out regularly. Now my blood pressure is running around 111/72, and my total cholesterol is 115. So, it seems all is going pretty well. But, I'm concerned about one main think. My HDL is 32. I think that's way too low. Also, I think my blood pressure is running too low on the systolic. I really want to get off of the medications, as I'm eating right and working out regularly. Before I suggest this to my doctor (who I'm seeing in two days), I would like an opinion about my concerns. Do I have a reason to be concerned, particular about the HDL being too low. Thanks in advance.
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billh99 responded:
Also, I think my blood pressure is running too low on the systolic.

115/75 is Ideal. Low blood pressure is under 90/50 and then only if you have symptoms.

But it is certainly time to discuss stopping/reducing your BP meds.

But, I'm concerned about one main think. My HDL is 32. I think that's way too low.

Yes, as an independent factor that is low. But you did not list your LDL. More detailed studies show that if the LDL is under 70 then HDL is not much of a risk factor.

Here are some of them things that can help raise HDL.

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hdl-cholesterol/CL00030/NSECTIONGROUP=2

Specially note the section about fats. Here is more information.

http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/is-fat-making-comeback

Also I have only seen this one place, but the HDL increase from losing weight only happens after the weight has stabalized. I am not sure how accurate this is. It might only be from the difference in diets between the losing weight and the stable phases.
 
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Arn5822 replied to billh99's response:
My LDL is 65. And so, your response gives me some peace of mind. I'm following pretty much all the protocols in the articles attached, except that I'm purposefully eating 8 to 10 eggs a week, cutting way way down on processed foods, all in an effort to lower my cholesterol and trying to raise my HDL up some. So far, though, during this period (of about 2 months) Triglycerides went from 105 to 87, Total Cholesterol went from 120 to 115 (I had been at 269 eight months ago), HDL went from 37 to 32, and LDL went from 62 to 65. I guess now the real test is to see how my results stabilize after I reach my ideal level weight. I'm new to this site and just want to make the point that making this into a science project for myself about myself, has certainly raised my awareness and has benefited me greatly so far. The next step, of course, is to get off the medications ... and see what happens. Thanks again for your response.
 
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billh99 replied to Arn5822's response:
Your welcome.

I'm new to this site and just want to make the point that making this into a science project for myself about myself, has certainly raised my awareness and has benefited me greatly so far.

I wish that more people would have the same awareness.

May too many people will ignore the advice about lifestyle changes. But rather take pills (if they do anything at all) with knowing or caring about what they are suppose to do, what side effects that they might have, and if they are or are not working for them.

Remember you are your own best doctor.


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