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Statins, Safer Than We thought?
avatar
iride6606 posted:
I was doing a little research today and ran across these, I was surprised how more and more benefits are being discovered. It looks like a favorite subject here so I thought I would post up.

http://www.medpagetoday.com/Cardiology/Dyslipidemia/34235

http://www.webmd.com/cholesterol-management/news/20120809/statin-diabetes-risk-limited-to-those-high-risk
Reply
 
avatar
Haylen_WebMD_Staff responded:
Thanks for the links! Good information for those hesitant to take a statin. For those who want to try a non-statin approach, here are some good resources:

Alternative Treatments for High Cholesterol

The article contains information on herbal and nutritional supplements that may lower cholesterol including garlic and red yeast rice.

Haylen
 
avatar
xccyclist replied to Haylen_WebMD_Staff's response:
Three years ago I began simvastatin and got good results -- bringing my dangerous level of total cholesterol (330) to a reasonable 230. Unfortunately simvastatin caused a bad muscle issue but a switch to Pravastatin solved that -- at a slightly less good cholesterol level. As a semi- vegetarian (poultry & fish a couple times a week) it wasn't until I completely switched gears and went low-carb (necessarily adding meat to my diet) that my cholesterol levels hit ideals -- 179 total, 53 triglycerides, 97 LDL, 84 HDL.. Apparently these improvements are not unusual in the low-carb community, except perhaps LDL tends to stay the same. Diane Kress, a registered dietitian, describes how she herself not only developed high cholesterol and hypertension while strictly following the theories she had been trained in, she also was diagnosed with diabetes 2. It was only when she sharply restricted carbs that she went off medications for these conditions, as she describes in Metabolism Miracle. Gary Taubes in Why We Get Fat, and researchers Volek & Phinney in The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living explain how the body can and does create its own blood lipids like cholesterol and triglycerides from innocent-seeming carbs, especially if a person is insulin- resistant.

These three sets of authors are a great resource for anyone interested in exploring cholesterol issues either in combination with or as an alternative to statins.
 
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farsidexyz replied to xccyclist's response:
xccyclist, are you still taking Pravastatin on your low Carb diet?


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