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    Unclogging Arteries
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    Anon_50208 posted:
    I have borderline high cholesterol. If I adjust my diet and lose weight, will this reduce the plaque already on my arteries or is that there to stay? Is there anything I can do to reduce that plaque?
    Reply
     
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    iride6606 responded:
    Once plaque is there it can't be removed. I wouldn't jump to the conclusion that you have any plaque build up with borderline high cholesterol. Much has to do with your age, how healthy you live and genetics. How old are you and how high was your cholesterol?
     
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    Camyel replied to iride6606's response:
    Who says plaque can't be removed?
    HDL lowers LDL and I've read that it SLOWLY removes plaque build-up ------- obviously there is always surgery where they go in and clean it out!
     
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    iride6606 replied to Camyel's response:
    The surgery you speak of is Endarterectomy and is only done in large smooth arteries in the neck and leg. There is no surgery to remove plaque from the arteries if the heart. Some hospitals in the UK are experimenting with this procedure but it is not approved here.

    There are some studies being conducted concerning Chelation therapy but it is focused on the calcium salts in plaques and has not been proven to reduce them. Also, once LDL becomes a calcified plaque HDL has no effect on it at all.
     
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    Anon_50208 replied to iride6606's response:
    58. Around 200 -- I'm taking statins, but it's not really coming down. Doing more exercise, moved to entirely fatfree dairy, so the next test should be better.
     
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    billh99 replied to Anon_50208's response:
    What is your total lipid panel?
     
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    Anon_50208 replied to billh99's response:
    Not sure. My "good" cholesterol was okay. I don't think I'm pre-diabetic, though it's possible low sugar comes from some imbalance -- thyroid? Again, MD checked and said okay.
     
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    bobby75703 replied to Anon_50208's response:
    I agree with iride about once plaque is there it can't be removed.

    Anon-50208, although the function of LDL and HDL are well understood, the LDL/HDL theory in atherosclerosis is one of many theories.

    It is without a doubt the most popular theory, but we still have yet to positively identify the underlying mechanism behind atherosclerosis.
     
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    billh99 replied to Anon_50208's response:
    You should get a copy of your lab report. Both the current one and one before you where on the statin.

    There are 4 main parts to the lipid panel. Total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglycerides.

    Not part of the lipid panel, but often done at the same time along with other blood test is the fasting glucose reading.

    Remember that while you want to watch saturated fats, you want lots of good fats.
     
    avatar
    bobby75703 responded:
    Anon50208, this may be a late question, but just how much plaque do you have in your arteries?


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