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Cholesterol also causes Alzheimer’s?
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iride6606 posted:
Another interesting study that suggests that LDL cholesterol plays a role in Alzheimer's disease. That's a 180 degrees from what has been reported previously that the brain needs cholesterol, now cholesterol may be the problem.

The link is below, but to put it simply, cholesterol is believed to bind with the proteins necessary for cognitive thought. Once these proteins bind with LDL, it prevents the protein from going where it is needed. Instead they end up going where the cholesterol goes and the process to break it down is a key in amyloid-beta production which helps promote Alzheimer's. These amyloid-beta destroy neurons which causes Alzheimer's. All of this would explain why statins are found to prevent the disease. Really interesting stuff;

http://psychcentral.com/news/2012/06/01/new-research-points-to-role-of-cholesterol-in-alzheimers/39550.html
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bobby75703 responded:
Cholesterol is a vital part of neurons and the brain. Without cholesterol in the brain, our brains wouldn't function. In fact, cholesterol is so vital for proper neurological function, the brain churns out its own cholesterol.
 
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iride6606 replied to bobby75703's response:
I'm just quoting the article. Here's another;

High levels of blood cholesterol increase the risk of both Alzheimer's disease and heart disease, but it has been unclear exactly how cholesterol damages the brain to promote Alzheimer's disease and blood vessels to promote atherosclerosis.

I'm just the messenger....................

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130415182507.htm
 
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bobby75703 replied to iride6606's response:
Cholesterol is a vital bio chemical for the brain and is needed in abundant amounts for proper brain function. This is why brains are so high in cholesterol.

Demonizing cholesterol is purely of financial interest for those on the receiving end of the cholesterol lowering money machine.
 
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iride6606 replied to bobby75703's response:
Is demonizig cancer and the pathogens that cause it to make a profit behind the highest selling class of drugs, anti-cancer and chemo drugs? No, I don't think so.Demonizing is the word of the week it seems so let's look as asthma drugs. Are doctors demoniizing asthma and the pathogens that trigger it for monetary purposes as well? The respiratory classes of drugs out sell statins as well.

Oh those eveil Oncologists and Pulminologists!.
 
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bobby75703 replied to iride6606's response:
"Oh those eveil Oncologists and Pulminologists!."


I never said that, or implied that. Those are your words. Not mine.


Cancer and asthma are disease states, which have legitimate drugs to treat them. They have nothing to do with the demonizing of cholesterol.
 
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iride6606 replied to bobby75703's response:

No, there is just as real a link to heart disease and cholesterol. It has been proven, links to the mechanism have been posted and studies showing the risk reductions of lower cholesterol. That's not demonizing cholesterol. I do like that word, I think I'll use it in the think tank I'm working with tomorrow on some economic issues. If we survive this turbulence.......
 
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bobby75703 replied to iride6606's response:
"No, there is just as real a link to heart disease and cholesterol. It has been proven,.."


You are welcome to believe whatever you want to believe about cholesterol.
 
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iride6606 replied to bobby75703's response:
For those that missed it, here it is, cholesterol explained including how it causes heart disease in detail. Read and lear, we all need to be aware so we are not demonized by cholesterol;

http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/116/16/1832.full
 
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bobby75703 replied to iride6606's response:
Read the article carefully iride.
 
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bobby75703 replied to bobby75703's response:
The article explores the Apo B hypothesis in initiating artery plaque and subsequent inflammatory process in vascular disease.

The apo B hypothesis like other theories is highly controversial. The Authors make their case in the article.

But at no point do the authors claim to have nailed the underlying mechanism in this disease. Rather they express hope that further understanding of the pathogenesis will help eliminate this disease in the future.
 
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bobby75703 replied to bobby75703's response:
The article does have its merits in underscoring how the process begins under the interior lining of artery walls.

But the overriding question is WHY? What triggers this process?

That's a question medical science is exploring. I hope it is answered within my lifetime.
 
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iride6606 replied to bobby75703's response:
The why is explained, read deeper. The why is not as imprtant in my mind as the result which is well proven.
 
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bobby75703 replied to iride6606's response:
I tend to lean towards the damage theory, whereas damage occurs to the artery lining and natural components in the blood then build up.

I do not view cholesterol, calcium and lipoprotiens, etc as the perpetrators. These components in serum were meant to be there, each with a specific purpose.

I think the killer has yet to be caught.
 
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bobby75703 replied to bobby75703's response:
A recent article from the American Heart Association sums up what I am trying to say.

May 2013:


"Exactly how atherosclerosis begins or what causes it isn't known, but some theories have been proposed..."


http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/Cholesterol/WhyCholesterolMatters/Atherosclerosis_UCM_305564_Article.jsp


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