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    cholesterol without meds
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    no19med34 posted:
    Please give some specifics on exercise to lower cholesterol without meds. I have had issues with statins and have changed them over the years. I am on crestor now and am having aching in my lower limbs which are disturbing my ability to get up and walk around with ease. painful but this is not the same side effect I had with other statins. Could this be a side effect of crestor. how do I control cholesterol without meds. please. a complete living schedule if possible.
    thanks

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    bobby75703 responded:
    If lowering cholesterol is important to you, it can be done without any drugs. But you have to understand the real principle behind it all. Lower calorie consumption lowers blood lipids and increased exercise lowers blood lipids.

    Take a look at this man who lost 37 lbs and lowered his cholesterol significantly eating at McDonalds.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/rosspomeroy/2014/01/07/super-size-me-science-teacher-loses-37-lbs-eating-at-mcdonalds/

    Now I don't recommend eating at McDonalds, BUT his story underscores the importance of cutting out excess calories and taking up walking, and its physiological impact on the human body.

    Lower cholesterol is one result. However its important to understand heart disease and heart attacks can occur at any cholesterol level. Having a low cholesterol level does not make a person immune to heart attacks or strokes.
     
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    iride6606 replied to bobby75703's response:
    True heart attacks can happen at any level, but in most cases people that develop CAD with a normal cholesterol level have recently taken steps to reduce their serum cholesterol levels. A person can have high cholesterol their entire life, make some changes, lower their cholesterol and still have a heart attack due to the damage already done so the statement that it can happen at any level is misleading. It's like saying lung cancer can happen to people that don't smoke (but did for many years), makes no sense.

    What is known is that lowering your cholesterol reduces your risk of a cardiac event by up to 42%, that is a proven fact.
     
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    bobby75703 responded:
    People with low cholesterol all their lives are not immune from developing heart disease or having heart attacks.
     
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    iride6606 replied to bobby75703's response:
    True, but the incidence of CAD for indivduals with a history of low cholesterol levels is a fraction of what it is for people that were diagnosed with high cholesterol at one time in their life. I can supply the data, just don't have access to it here but there is a significant difference in risk between a person with normally low cholesterol and the individual with a history of high cholesterol for any period of time. Again, it's about the odds.
     
    avatar
    billh99 responded:
    You did not give background. But you might want to talk to your doctor about the new guidelines. In general they don't look at treating LDL to specific level. Only treating if there LDL is very high or if you have a history of heart conditions or a certain risk level.

    You might need the statin.

    Also there are things that can sometime help with tolerating the statins. Have your vit D levels check. If low take a high level suppliment until it is normal.

    Also try taking CO q-10. That helps some people.

    Also some doctors find that giving low dose statins every other day, or every 3 day works for some people.

    Also you might want to talk to your doctor about getting some advanced testing for things like lipid particles (NMR). There is some indicate that the number of particles is more indicative of risk then absolute amount of cholesterol.

    I don't know if any research that has show any type of exercise better than another one for controlling cholesterol levels. But my guess is that mainly aerobic, but mixed with some resistance exercises is the best. And my guess is that high intensive interval training is better than long slower exercises.

    And some people have had great cholesterol drops using very restrictive plant based diets such as Ornish, but there are not easy to follow.

    In general one that includes lots of fruits and vegetables, includes healthy fats, and limit carbs helps control cholesterol. And specially you want to restrict refined carbs, sugar, white flour, white rice.


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