Skip to content
Statin may slow untreatable, progressive stage of multiple sclerosis
avatar
iride6606 posted:
There has been an explosion of statin off-label use studies going public over the past 6 months. The reason? There was much speculation about the off-label uses for statins starting around 1997 when researchers first saw their effect on inflammation. This launched hundreds of studies as researches attempted to see how many conditions statins could be used to treat. These studies are running their course and the data is going public, it's an exciting time. Here is one of the most recent concerning a disease that has shown a resistance to any other treatment except statins;




Simvastatin, a cheap cholesterol lowering drug, might be a potential treatment option for the secondary progressive, or chronic, stage of multiple sclerosis, which is currently untreatable, results of a phase 2 study suggest. Findings from the trial showed that a high, daily dose of simvastatin was safe, well tolerated, and slowed brain atrophy (shrinkage) by 43% over two years compared with placebo


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140318190031.htm
Reply
FirstPrevious12NextLast
 
avatar
bobby75703 responded:
Its just amazing how statins may treat every ailment under the sun. Sound familiar? It does to me.

Remember the old westerns portraying the medicine men selling tonic from their horse drawn wagons? That was back in 1880.

Welcome to 2014. Nothing has changed. Except they drive a Lexus.
 
avatar
iride6606 replied to bobby75703's response:
Remember the old westerns portraying the medicine men selling tonic from their horse drawn wagons? That was back in 1880. Welcome to 2014. Nothing has changed


Really??? Were they doing science based studies with hundreds of thousands of participants in the 1880's? Seems like quite a bit has changed.


Some will see the data and dismiss it, that's what hasn't changed. If you're a person with MS, this is hope.
 
avatar
bobby75703 replied to iride6606's response:
iride, have you ever heard the term "weasel words" in the legal world?

Well, these articles you are posting are plagued with them.
 
avatar
iride6606 replied to bobby75703's response:
And there's the hypocrisy. Some people complain about words like "may" and "can" and "perhaps" and say therefore the paper is of no value. These are the same people that run around pointing to the FDA warning on statins, loaded with "may", "can" "perhaps".


If some don't want to believe, they won't. They will always find a reason to stick with their comfortable core beliefs. It's safe and easy.
 
avatar
bobby75703 replied to iride6606's response:
Its not about beliefs, but understanding physiology enough to notice when something doesn't add up.

Cholesterol is vital to nerve function. Inhibiting cholesterol production is about the worst thing you could give an MS patient. It would not give them hope, but it might give them painful neuropathy.
 
avatar
iride6606 replied to bobby75703's response:
It's all about beliefs and an unwillingness to get past outdated thinking. Statin related neuropathy occurs in 1 out of 10,000 patients on statins, you have a better chance of being harmed by Ibuprofen.
 
avatar
bobby75703 replied to iride6606's response:
If you want to go on believing that, you are certainly welcome to do so.
 
avatar
iride6606 replied to bobby75703's response:
I most certainly do believe it, I can be open minded and look beyond what was known yesterday. I a read the data, I understand what I read, I don't need headlines to tell me what to believe.
 
avatar
bobby75703 replied to iride6606's response:
Good luck.
 
avatar
iride6606 replied to bobby75703's response:
MS sufferers, take note;


People living with late-stage multiple sclerosis (MS) could have their condition significantly improved by taking statins, doctors have found, in a "surprise" discovery which could be of major benefit to thousands of sufferers.


In results described as "very exciting" by the leading MS charity, researchers found that taking a large daily dose of statins, which are commonly used to reduce the risk of heart disease, could also slow the progression of MS in its later, more debilitating phase.


Patients who took the drugs over two years experienced less severe symptoms of disability, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans revealed that their brains shrank at a slower rate than patients who took a placebo.


http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/surprise-discovery-shows-multiple-sclerosis-sufferers-lives-are-significantly-improved-by-taking-statins-9200117.html
 
avatar
bobby75703 replied to iride6606's response:
There is an old wise saying " When something is too good to be true, it generally is."

There is another wise saying. "Let the buyer beware"

Both go hand in hand.
 
avatar
iride6606 replied to bobby75703's response:
As a person with MS I can say you'll take any hope you can find. Is there anything wrong with that?


I bet in the 1880's they all would have thought that a vehicle that could take a person from San Francisco to New York in 6 hours was too good to be true as well. Good thing the next generations were not limited by their core beliefs. Now that's a more accurate comparison.
 
avatar
bobby75703 replied to iride6606's response:
There is nothing wrong with hope. But there is something wrong with giving people false hope.
 
avatar
iride6606 replied to bobby75703's response:
Results of a phase 2 study published in The Lancet suggest that simvastatin, a cheap cholesterol lowering drug, might be a potential treatment option for the secondary progressive, or chronic, stage of multiple sclerosis (MS), which is currently untreatable.


Findings from the MS-STAT trial showed that a high, daily dose of simvastatin was safe, well tolerated, and slowed brain atrophy (shrinkage) by 43% over two years compared with placebo. Longitudinal studies suggest that atrophy progression is linked with disability.


http://www.sciencenewsline.com/articles/2014031822560020.html


Featuring Experts

There are no Expert stories for this community right now

Helpful Tips

Reduce you cholesterol
You can reduce your cholesterol without paying for the expensive drugs while you still enjoy the food you like. Here we provide the 5 days ... More
Was this Helpful?
7 of 14 found this helpful

Related News

There was an error with this newsfeed

Related Drug Reviews

  • Drug Name User Reviews

Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA

FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.