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    High cholesterol and High TSH level
    avatar
    sriayer posted:
    Dr. Richman,

    I recently got my health check up done. My cholesterol levels are given below:

    Total cholesterol = 291 HDL = 46 LDL = 186 (VLDL = 59) Triglycerides = 294

    My doctor has recommended Lipitor. While going through the lab results, i noticed the following in addition to above:

    T4 = 6.1 TSH = 5.631

    My doctor did not talk to me about the above. I did some research and there are articles on the web that talk about the correlation between high TSH and high cholesterol levels.

    My question is does high cholesterol cause high TSH or is it the other way around? Btw, there is no history of heart disease in my family. My parents have normal cholesterol levels and i am a strict vegetarian. Everything else on my lab report is normal except for the above.

    Thanks, Sri Ayer
    Reply
     
    avatar
    bobby75703 responded:
    Elevated TSH causes high cholesterol.

    According to your thyroid function tests results you are hypothyroid, which is most likely the cause of your lipid elevation. The numbers correlate very well.

    Its hard to comprehend why your doctor did not tell your about the hypothyroidism. Prescribing lipitor would lower your cholesterol, giving you a rosey lab report. But the underlying problem of hypothyroidism should not be ignored and go untreated.

    Thyroid hormone treatment will only cost about $15 per month, will lower your cholesterol and triglycerides, and you will have more physical energy, and you won't bear the health risks from lipitor.

    Ideal TSH is in the bottom half of the published range. According to Endocrinology at the University of Texas, a TSH between 1.0 and 2.0 is ideal.

    You did not mention T3. This is the active thyroid hormone and should also be measured. A sharp physician will look at TSH and Free levels of both T4 and T3, among other factors and make an assesment.

    Best to you!
     
    avatar
    healus88 responded:
    am too a vegetarian....and found my latest blood work showed elevation....not as high as yours but i was so suprised yet it could of been some holiday eating im not use to , with the rich cookies and foods and all.... am usually pretty careful about what i eat and how healthy it is....i do eat some pizza etc sometimes but all in moderation , ya know...

    hope you find out something , id be interested to know ......

    just got this ringing in my ears back in oct 08 and im wondering if it has to do with my cholesterol....or what?

    good luck to ya....


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