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Vibrating eardrum?
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Doug35 posted:
Rod, I had a bad cold 2 weeks ago with head and chest congestion. The doctor diagnosed sinusitis and put me on antibiotic and decongestant. 1 week into it, my right ear blocked. Felt like someone poured concrete into my right ear. Went back to doctor and he saw fluid, said to let antibiotics work and let it run its course. The ear block came and went for another week. Saw an ENT and he prescribed Nasonex. Now my ear feels clear, but some voices sound a little garbled, and when it's quiet I can hear a low humming sound in my right ear that feels like my eardrum is vibrating. Very scary. What is this vibrating sound? Thanks for your time.
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Doug35 responded:
Another thing I should mention... When I was 16 I had a perforation to my right eardrum which required surgery to repair. So I don't have the average eardrum.

Thanks again Dr. Moser.
 
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Rod_Moser_PA_PhD responded:
The vibrations you are hearing may be a variation of tinnitus (ringing), not an uncommon symptom for someone with middle ear fluid (effusion). Sometimes, the muscles that attach those three little ear bones in the middle ear space can develop spasm, just like a twitching muscles spasm of your leg. This is called myoclonus. Many times, this will resolve on its own, but if it does not, it will need to be evaluated by the ENT again.

My guess (and it is a guess since I can't examine you) is that the vibrations/humming is a tinnitus variation. Finding the source of any tinnitus can be very difficult, but it appears that this is related to your middle ear fluid. Let's hope it just resolves spontaneously as you get better.
 
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Doug35 responded:
Good news! After 3 days the vibrating sound resolved itself and the fluid appears to be gone for good.

Thanks Dr. Moser!
 
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Rod_Moser_PA_PhD responded:
We have a saying in medicine....

GONE is GOOD.

I am pleased that you are feeling well again. Thanks for the update.
 
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DwightFry responded:
I have had this vibrating eardrum for 15 years only in my left ear. It's been on and off, and it seems to be set off by new drugs that I definitely need to take for pain. No other painkillers are helping my spinal injuries from a car accident.

I'm going to go to call my Dr. for a referral to an ENT. Are there any questions I should ask him about? Is there any permanent fix for this? It interferes with my daily life. Thanks!
 
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Rod_Moser_PA_PhD responded:
I do not have enough information about you, or your particular case to know if your symptoms have a permanant "fix" or not, my friend. This is why you need to see the ENT. Every person...and every case is unique. After you are carefully examined by the ENT, you should be able to get some answers.
 
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Fiu013 responded:
Ive had a vibrating eardrum since i went to the beach and got water in my ear about 3 months ago. It was'nt noticeable at first but as of today it feels like my ear is clogged. I recently got into the pool and put my head under water and it felt as if the water went in but couldnt get out any idea on what is happening ??
 
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Rod_Moser_PA_PhD responded:
Unfortunately, it is not possible to determine a specific cause of your vibrating eardrum over the Internet, based solely on your brief posting. You would need to see your medical provider -- someone that knows you, your medical history, and of course, someone that has the ability to examine your ears. There can be many causes to account for your symtpoms, from a wax impaction to a middle ear/eustachian tube disorder.
 
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luppee replied to Rod_Moser_PA_PhD's response:
I have recently been to two different ENTs. Both had different opinions and ideas.

My right ear pops every time i swallow. My main concern is not the popping, but the sensitivity. My right ear has recently got very sensitive to certain sounds. I hear a vibration after hearing certain sounds. its worst in the morning, fluid is also found in my right ear every morning. Its driving me crazy. It only vibrates after a high pitch sound. otherwise im fine.

An ENT has also suggested an operation to remove the extra 'meat in my nose'. another has suggested bot-ox. Anthor has suggested an operation which involves a tube and no diving afterwards.

Please advise on the above, as i am confused and still with the vibration/echo. ps even after i shout/or speak loudly it vibrates.

Thanks
 
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to luppee's response:
Unlike the two ENTs that have examined you, I do not know the details of your case, nothing about your medical history, and of course, I have no way of examining you myself. Offering a "blind opinion"....a third opinion in your case....is not something that I can really do over the Internet. Did anyone give you a diagnosis?

On the surface, this sounds like ETD - Eustachian Tube Dysfunction, but there can be many reasons to account for your symptoms. I am not sure that I buy the"remove some of the meat from your nose" approach, or even the Botox, but this is soley based on the brief information that you have posted.

I am really sorry, but I do not have enough information to offer you any insight.
 
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luppee replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
Thank you for your quick response. I have read all the symptoms of ETD and feel that it could be it. If so what is the best remedy for this dysfunction?

Thanks
 
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to luppee's response:
Most cases of ETD will self-resolve in a week or so. Although controversial, decongestants (like pseudoephedrine) can help, but not all people can medically use them. It is always best to check with your own medical provider first. Prescription nasal corticosteroid sprays have also be used, especially in people with allergies.

Either way, it will take TIME to resolve, so be patient and hang in there. If your symptoms persists longer than a few weeks, you need to inform your medical provider.
 
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luppee replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
Thats the problem.. i went to two ENT's. The first suggested a decongestant for only a week... it did help.. but the vibration came back once again. this has been going on for about 4 months now. Another ENT said it has to do with damaged receptors!


I found out that a ventilation tube can be placed in the ear drum and relieves the symptoms of ET dysfunction but creates a perforation in the eardrum which reduces hearing to a small extent as well as provides a potential entry point for infection. is this worth doing, cause if this problem persists i have no option but to do it!


Thanks a lot!
 
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to luppee's response:
You have two different opinions. If you do have chronic ETD, the tubes will help...and they are safe. If anything, tubes will improve your hearing, not make it worse. And, they tend to prevent infection, not cause them. However...this would be if you really need them; something that I cannot determine over the Internet.


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