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    Includes Expert Content
    How does a subwoofer affect hearing?
    avatar
    anon10 posted:
    It produces a low noise and a lot of vibration. Is it worse or better then speakers? How bad is it for potential hearing loss?
    Reply
     
    avatar
    Rod Moser, PA, PhD responded:
    It is not the frequency, but rather the volume....and the duration of that volume, that is the most damaging to the ears. Basically, that low bass rumble...the kind that rattles windows, shakes cars, etc. is VERY bad for your ears.
     
    avatar
    anon10 replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
    So, is bass emitted from a subwoofer louder volume then speakers? Should the same rule for how much noise you can listen to a day be applied to bass. Or should the exposure be less?

    How is low bass very bad for my ears?

    Thanks
     
    avatar
    Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to anon10's response:
    I have no idea what VOLUME you are experiencing. Again, the frequency is not as critical as the VOLUME.

    Just "turn it down" or be prepared in later life to deal with noise-induced hearing loss.
     
    avatar
    anon10 replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
    "Basically, that low bass rumble...the kind that rattles windows, shakes cars, etc. is VERY bad for your ears"


    I'm having trouble with this statement. How is the rumble of a bass that can rattle a window worse then loud volume? Does the vibration cause damage?


    My subwoofer comes with my speakers. Most of the loud volume comes from the speakers. The bass simply adds vibration and I guess a few decibels extra noise.
     
    avatar
    Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to anon10's response:
    Get someone to measure the decibel level of your intended VOLUME, then you will know where you stand. I have no idea how loud you turn up your speakers.

    It is up to you to make these decisions. I cannot get into an endless discussion about what is more damaging....frequency or volume. I have already shared my concern about volume, so if you want to listen to a real, low-volume, low-frequency rumble, it is your call. I suspect you are cranking up the volume, however.

    By the way, how old are you?
     
    avatar
    anon10 replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
    I am 20. I don't listen to music too loud or have the bass up too high, so I should be okay. I also only listen to one album a day so I only have an hour's exposure.

    I simply wished to know if you believe that purchasing speakers that come with a sub woofer is okay or dangerous. Reading between the lines, it seems it is okay as long as volume levels are okay.
     
    avatar
    Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to anon10's response:
    I wish you the best, my friend. Remember that this is your only set of ears, so you have to take care of them. Don't abuse them in your youth, only to pay the price in adulthood.
     
    avatar
    MosesMK replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
    Hi Doc

    Can the low frequency trigger heart problem?

    Thanks.


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