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Is it true that you have increased white blood cells after cold/infection that will prevent other infections?
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MHP8982 posted:
My husband and I are just getting over colds/sinus infections. He is a teacher and had 2 students get sick in his class today with a stomach bug. I told him I was concerned about us getting that now.. and he told me that with taking vitamins and having a higher white blood cell count after our colds, it should help prevent us from getting sick with anything else? I know obviously a cold might give immunity to the same cold.. but not immunity to another infection all together... but I guess he just means that we have a better ability to fight other things off after a cold? Is this true? he's not a Dr... and I've never heard this and can't find anything about it? Just wondering if anyone else has heard this?
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD responded:
As a teacher, your husband probably has a very good immune system from his constant exposure. A cold (a respiratory virus) does not protect you against getting a gastrointestinal virus. Vitamins do not prevent colds or other viral infections. I suspect that his white count is not different than other people, or normal.

Whether he gets sick or not is more dependent on his past immunity. If he has had a similar virus in the past, he will not likely get sick, or if it does, only get a mild illness.


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