Skip to content
Includes Expert Content
Combination of vaccines...
avatar
sdadkin posted:
Yesterday I went to get a flu shot. There was a table set up at the Walmart where I work. I asked the nurse if I was able to get the whooping cough vaccination as well since I have two children under 3 and she said that it was covered under my insurance. She actually showed me a list of all the vaccines I could get under my insurance and recommended that I also get the pneumonia one as well. I got the flu shot and pneumonia in the same arm and the tetanus/whooping cough one in my other arm. She told me that the tetanus one would leave my arm sore so I should try and move it around a lot. I did as much as I could at work to move both arms (I did a lot of stocking which I don't normally do).

Anyway, later that night I started to feel real achy (kind of like the beginnings of the flu) and the arm where I got the 2 vaccines hurt so bad I couldn't move it. I took a warm shower and some sinus meds and tried to go to sleep. I still couldn't move my arm because it hurt so bad. Then I woke up with the chills several times. Needless to say, I didn't sleep very well. Today, I still feel achy and can barely move my arm.

I am a healthy 27 year old female who has had the flu shot for the last few years problem free. I had a tetanus shot in high school without any side effects. The only one I hadn't had before was the pneumonia one. Could this be what is causing me so much pain in my arm? After researching the pneumonia vaccine on Webmd I don't think I should have gotten it at all, but the nurse talked me into it because it was free. Is it normal for it to hurt so bad? Is it normal for me to be achy and have the chills with the vaccines? Or is that part just coincidence? Also, how long til my arm stops hurting? Please help!
Reply
 
avatar
Rod Moser, PA, PhD responded:
I agree...a healthy 27 year old probably does not need the pneumovax (pneumonia vaccine), unless you have asthma or other risk factors. You should try and find out what they gave it to you when it wasn't indicated. The fact that it is "covered by insurance" should not be the reason!

The achey arm is most likely from the injection, not the vaccine. The flu vaccine should not cause this type of reaction, but if the needle hits a nerve bundle (hidden under the skin), a person can definitely have some issues. The chills? It could be a vaccine reaction, but again, his is not typical.

There is no way for me to know how long your arm may hurt, since I have no way of examining you, but I suggest that you see your medical provider if you are not getting progressively better over the next week.
 
avatar
sdadkin replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
Thanks so much for your reply Dr Moser! I only had the chills that first day and part of the second day. My arm hurt really bad for about 4 days and it is finally getting better. It's still really sore, but at least I can move it like normal now.

There's a different nurse here every day, so it's not likely that I will see the same one again to ask her why. I definitely wont make the mistake of getting another pneumovax!
 
avatar
Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to sdadkin's response:
You are very welcome....and the good news is that, right now, only ONE pneumovax is necessary for life, but of course you got yours quite early. I give that vaccine to children sometimes who have a high-risk of pneumococcal disease, so it is not a big vaccine that would hurt you. The real issues was that you didn't need it.....

I am glad your arm is better from the injection.


Helpful Tips

Ear and allergies
For what it's worth, my brother has been getting allergy shots for a year and the ringing in his ears has stopped..... More
Was this Helpful?
1 of 1 found this helpful

Expert Blog

Focus on Flu

Find answers to your questions about seasonal flu issues and answers to your concerns about the flu season and H1N1...Read More

Related News

There was an error with this newsfeed

Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA

FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.